Maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy and childhood obesity at age 5 years

On behalf of the PCORnet Antibiotics and Childhood Growth Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The benefits of antibiotic treatment during pregnancy are immediate, but there may be long-term risks to the developing child. Prior studies show an association between early life antibiotics and obesity, but few have examined this risk during pregnancy. Subjects: To evaluate the association of maternal antibiotic exposure during pregnancy on childhood BMI-z at 5 years, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis. Using electronic health record data from seven health systems in PCORnet, a national distributed clinical research network, we included children with same-day height and weight measures who could be linked to mothers with vital measurements during pregnancy. The primary independent variable was maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy (any versus none). We examined dose response (number of antibiotic episodes), spectrum and class of antibiotics, and antibiotic episodes by trimester. The primary outcome was child age- and sex-specific BMI-z at age 5 years. Results: The final sample was 53,320 mother–child pairs. During pregnancy, 29.9% of mothers received antibiotics. In adjusted models, maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy were not associated with child BMI-z at age 5 years (β = 0.00, 95% CI −0.03, 0.02). When evaluating timing during pregnancy, dose-response, spectrum and class of antibiotics, there were no associations of maternal antibiotics with child BMI-z at age 5 years. Conclusion: In this large observational cohort, provision of antibiotics during pregnancy was not associated with childhood BMI-z at 5 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Mothers
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pregnancy
Prescriptions
Outpatients
Maternal Exposure
Electronic Health Records
Cohort Studies
Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy and childhood obesity at age 5 years. / On behalf of the PCORnet Antibiotics and Childhood Growth Study Group.

In: International Journal of Obesity, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

On behalf of the PCORnet Antibiotics and Childhood Growth Study Group. / Maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy and childhood obesity at age 5 years. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2019.
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title = "Maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy and childhood obesity at age 5 years",
abstract = "Objective: The benefits of antibiotic treatment during pregnancy are immediate, but there may be long-term risks to the developing child. Prior studies show an association between early life antibiotics and obesity, but few have examined this risk during pregnancy. Subjects: To evaluate the association of maternal antibiotic exposure during pregnancy on childhood BMI-z at 5 years, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis. Using electronic health record data from seven health systems in PCORnet, a national distributed clinical research network, we included children with same-day height and weight measures who could be linked to mothers with vital measurements during pregnancy. The primary independent variable was maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy (any versus none). We examined dose response (number of antibiotic episodes), spectrum and class of antibiotics, and antibiotic episodes by trimester. The primary outcome was child age- and sex-specific BMI-z at age 5 years. Results: The final sample was 53,320 mother–child pairs. During pregnancy, 29.9{\%} of mothers received antibiotics. In adjusted models, maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy were not associated with child BMI-z at age 5 years (β = 0.00, 95{\%} CI −0.03, 0.02). When evaluating timing during pregnancy, dose-response, spectrum and class of antibiotics, there were no associations of maternal antibiotics with child BMI-z at age 5 years. Conclusion: In this large observational cohort, provision of antibiotics during pregnancy was not associated with childhood BMI-z at 5 years.",
author = "{On behalf of the PCORnet Antibiotics and Childhood Growth Study Group} and Heerman, {William J.} and Daley, {Matthew F.} and Janne Heinonen and Rifas-Shiman, {Sheryl L.} and Bailey, {L. Charles} and Forrest, {Christopher B.} and Young, {Jessica G.} and Gillman, {Matthew W.} and Horgan, {Casie E.} and Janicke, {David M.} and Chelsea Jenter and Kharbanda, {Elyse O.} and Doug Lunsford and Messito, {Mary Jo} and Sengwee Toh and Block, {Jason P.} and David Arterburn and Cleveland, {Lauren P.} and Jonathan Finkelstein and Fitzpatrick, {Stephanie L.} and Andrea Goodman and Michael Horberg and Jenny Ingber and Kathleen Murphy and Peay, {Holly Landrum} and Pedro Rivera and Reynolds, {Juliane S.} and Sturtevant, {Jessica L.} and Ivette Torres",
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T1 - Maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy and childhood obesity at age 5 years

AU - On behalf of the PCORnet Antibiotics and Childhood Growth Study Group

AU - Heerman, William J.

AU - Daley, Matthew F.

AU - Heinonen, Janne

AU - Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.

AU - Bailey, L. Charles

AU - Forrest, Christopher B.

AU - Young, Jessica G.

AU - Gillman, Matthew W.

AU - Horgan, Casie E.

AU - Janicke, David M.

AU - Jenter, Chelsea

AU - Kharbanda, Elyse O.

AU - Lunsford, Doug

AU - Messito, Mary Jo

AU - Toh, Sengwee

AU - Block, Jason P.

AU - Arterburn, David

AU - Cleveland, Lauren P.

AU - Finkelstein, Jonathan

AU - Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.

AU - Goodman, Andrea

AU - Horberg, Michael

AU - Ingber, Jenny

AU - Murphy, Kathleen

AU - Peay, Holly Landrum

AU - Rivera, Pedro

AU - Reynolds, Juliane S.

AU - Sturtevant, Jessica L.

AU - Torres, Ivette

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: The benefits of antibiotic treatment during pregnancy are immediate, but there may be long-term risks to the developing child. Prior studies show an association between early life antibiotics and obesity, but few have examined this risk during pregnancy. Subjects: To evaluate the association of maternal antibiotic exposure during pregnancy on childhood BMI-z at 5 years, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis. Using electronic health record data from seven health systems in PCORnet, a national distributed clinical research network, we included children with same-day height and weight measures who could be linked to mothers with vital measurements during pregnancy. The primary independent variable was maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy (any versus none). We examined dose response (number of antibiotic episodes), spectrum and class of antibiotics, and antibiotic episodes by trimester. The primary outcome was child age- and sex-specific BMI-z at age 5 years. Results: The final sample was 53,320 mother–child pairs. During pregnancy, 29.9% of mothers received antibiotics. In adjusted models, maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy were not associated with child BMI-z at age 5 years (β = 0.00, 95% CI −0.03, 0.02). When evaluating timing during pregnancy, dose-response, spectrum and class of antibiotics, there were no associations of maternal antibiotics with child BMI-z at age 5 years. Conclusion: In this large observational cohort, provision of antibiotics during pregnancy was not associated with childhood BMI-z at 5 years.

AB - Objective: The benefits of antibiotic treatment during pregnancy are immediate, but there may be long-term risks to the developing child. Prior studies show an association between early life antibiotics and obesity, but few have examined this risk during pregnancy. Subjects: To evaluate the association of maternal antibiotic exposure during pregnancy on childhood BMI-z at 5 years, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis. Using electronic health record data from seven health systems in PCORnet, a national distributed clinical research network, we included children with same-day height and weight measures who could be linked to mothers with vital measurements during pregnancy. The primary independent variable was maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy (any versus none). We examined dose response (number of antibiotic episodes), spectrum and class of antibiotics, and antibiotic episodes by trimester. The primary outcome was child age- and sex-specific BMI-z at age 5 years. Results: The final sample was 53,320 mother–child pairs. During pregnancy, 29.9% of mothers received antibiotics. In adjusted models, maternal outpatient antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy were not associated with child BMI-z at age 5 years (β = 0.00, 95% CI −0.03, 0.02). When evaluating timing during pregnancy, dose-response, spectrum and class of antibiotics, there were no associations of maternal antibiotics with child BMI-z at age 5 years. Conclusion: In this large observational cohort, provision of antibiotics during pregnancy was not associated with childhood BMI-z at 5 years.

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