Mast cells can contribute to axon-glial dissociation and fibrosis in peripheral nerve

Kelly Monk, Jianqiang Wu, Jon P. Williams, Brenda A. Finney, Maureen E. Fitzgerald, Marie Dominique Filippi, Nancy Ratner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in murine Schwann cells results in loss of axon-Schwann cell interactions and collagen deposition, modeling peripheral nerve response to injury and tumorigenesis. Mast cells infiltrate nerves in all three situations. We show that mast cells are present in normal mouse peripheral nerve beginning at 4 weeks of age, and that the number of mast-cells in EGFR+ nerves increases abruptly at 5-6 weeks of age as axons and Schwann cells dissociate. The increase in mast cell number is preceded and accompanied by elevated levels of mRNAs encoding the mast-cell chemoattractants Rantes, SCF and VEGF. Genetic ablation of mast cells and bone marrow reconstitution in W41 x EGFR+ mice indicate a role for mast cells in loss of axon-Schwann cell interactions and collagen deposition. Pharmacological stabilization of mast cells by disodium cromoglycate administration to EGFR+ mice also diminished loss of axon-Schwann cell interaction. Together these three lines of evidence support the hypothesis that mast cells can contribute to alterations in peripheral nerves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-244
Number of pages12
JournalNeuron Glia Biology
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Peripheral Nerves
Mast Cells
Neuroglia
Axons
Fibrosis
Schwann Cells
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor
Cell Communication
Collagen
Cromolyn Sodium
Chemotactic Factors
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Carcinogenesis
Cell Count
Bone Marrow
Pharmacology
Messenger RNA
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • EGFR
  • NF1
  • Remak bundle
  • Schwann cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Monk, K., Wu, J., Williams, J. P., Finney, B. A., Fitzgerald, M. E., Filippi, M. D., & Ratner, N. (2007). Mast cells can contribute to axon-glial dissociation and fibrosis in peripheral nerve. Neuron Glia Biology, 3(3), 233-244. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1740925X08000021

Mast cells can contribute to axon-glial dissociation and fibrosis in peripheral nerve. / Monk, Kelly; Wu, Jianqiang; Williams, Jon P.; Finney, Brenda A.; Fitzgerald, Maureen E.; Filippi, Marie Dominique; Ratner, Nancy.

In: Neuron Glia Biology, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.08.2007, p. 233-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monk, K, Wu, J, Williams, JP, Finney, BA, Fitzgerald, ME, Filippi, MD & Ratner, N 2007, 'Mast cells can contribute to axon-glial dissociation and fibrosis in peripheral nerve', Neuron Glia Biology, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 233-244. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1740925X08000021
Monk, Kelly ; Wu, Jianqiang ; Williams, Jon P. ; Finney, Brenda A. ; Fitzgerald, Maureen E. ; Filippi, Marie Dominique ; Ratner, Nancy. / Mast cells can contribute to axon-glial dissociation and fibrosis in peripheral nerve. In: Neuron Glia Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 233-244.
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