Massive subcutaneous emphysema following percutaneous tracheostomy

David M. Kaylie, Mark Wax

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Bronchoscopic subcutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is fast becoming the method of choice for securing an airway in chronic ventilated patients in an intensive care setting. Many studies have demonstrated that it is a cost-effective and safe procedure in experienced hands. Complications appear to be equivalent to those encountered in open tracheostomy. Subcutaneous emphysema following tracheostomy is a rare occurrence. Only 3 cases have been described following percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. Management can be quite complex. Material and Methods: Retrospective review with case report of a patient with massive subcutaneous emphysema following percutaneous tracheostomy. Conclusion: Massive subcutaneous emphysema following percutaneous tracheostomy is a major complication that is rarely encountered. When due to a posterior tracheal wall tear, management consists of bypassing the laceration and allowing it to heal secondarily.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)300-302
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

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Subcutaneous Emphysema
Tracheostomy
Lacerations
Critical Care
Tears
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Massive subcutaneous emphysema following percutaneous tracheostomy. / Kaylie, David M.; Wax, Mark.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 5, 09.2002, p. 300-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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