Mass histology to quantify neurodegeneration in drosophila

Elizabeth R. Sunderhaus, Doris Kretzschmar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Progressive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) are an increasing threat to human health worldwide. Although mammalian models have provided important insights into the underlying mechanisms of pathogenicity, the complexity of mammalian systems together with their high costs are limiting their use. Therefore, the simple but well-established Drosophila model-system provides an alternative for investigating the molecular pathways that are affected in these diseases. Besides behavioral deficits, neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by histological phenotypes such as neuronal death and axonopathy. To quantify neuronal degeneration and to determine how it is affected by genetic and environmental factors, we use a histological approach that is based on measuring the vacuoles in adult fly brains. To minimize the effects of systematic error and to directly compare sections from control and experimental flies in one preparation, we use the 'collar' method for paraffin sections. Neurodegeneration is then assessed by measuring the size and/or number of vacuoles that have developed in the fly brain. This can either be done by focusing on a specific region of interest or by analyzing the entire brain by obtaining serial sections that span the complete head. Therefore, this method allows one to measure not only severe degeneration but also relatively mild phenotypes that are only detectable in a few sections, as occurs during normal aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere54809
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2016
Issue number118
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2016

Fingerprint

Histology
Diptera
Neurodegenerative diseases
Drosophila
Brain
Vacuoles
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Phenotype
Systematic errors
Paraffin
Paraffins
Parkinson Disease
Virulence
Alzheimer Disease
Aging of materials
Head
Health
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs

Keywords

  • Adult nervous system
  • Degenerative diseases
  • Drosophila
  • Histology
  • Issue 118
  • Neurobiology
  • Neuroscience
  • Paraffin sections
  • Vacuoles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Mass histology to quantify neurodegeneration in drosophila. / Sunderhaus, Elizabeth R.; Kretzschmar, Doris.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, Vol. 2016, No. 118, e54809, 15.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c8ddea5d52fc49f189da3e07ab6d8452,
title = "Mass histology to quantify neurodegeneration in drosophila",
abstract = "Progressive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) are an increasing threat to human health worldwide. Although mammalian models have provided important insights into the underlying mechanisms of pathogenicity, the complexity of mammalian systems together with their high costs are limiting their use. Therefore, the simple but well-established Drosophila model-system provides an alternative for investigating the molecular pathways that are affected in these diseases. Besides behavioral deficits, neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by histological phenotypes such as neuronal death and axonopathy. To quantify neuronal degeneration and to determine how it is affected by genetic and environmental factors, we use a histological approach that is based on measuring the vacuoles in adult fly brains. To minimize the effects of systematic error and to directly compare sections from control and experimental flies in one preparation, we use the 'collar' method for paraffin sections. Neurodegeneration is then assessed by measuring the size and/or number of vacuoles that have developed in the fly brain. This can either be done by focusing on a specific region of interest or by analyzing the entire brain by obtaining serial sections that span the complete head. Therefore, this method allows one to measure not only severe degeneration but also relatively mild phenotypes that are only detectable in a few sections, as occurs during normal aging.",
keywords = "Adult nervous system, Degenerative diseases, Drosophila, Histology, Issue 118, Neurobiology, Neuroscience, Paraffin sections, Vacuoles",
author = "Sunderhaus, {Elizabeth R.} and Doris Kretzschmar",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.3791/54809",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2016",
journal = "Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE",
issn = "1940-087X",
publisher = "MYJoVE Corporation",
number = "118",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mass histology to quantify neurodegeneration in drosophila

AU - Sunderhaus, Elizabeth R.

AU - Kretzschmar, Doris

PY - 2016/12/15

Y1 - 2016/12/15

N2 - Progressive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) are an increasing threat to human health worldwide. Although mammalian models have provided important insights into the underlying mechanisms of pathogenicity, the complexity of mammalian systems together with their high costs are limiting their use. Therefore, the simple but well-established Drosophila model-system provides an alternative for investigating the molecular pathways that are affected in these diseases. Besides behavioral deficits, neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by histological phenotypes such as neuronal death and axonopathy. To quantify neuronal degeneration and to determine how it is affected by genetic and environmental factors, we use a histological approach that is based on measuring the vacuoles in adult fly brains. To minimize the effects of systematic error and to directly compare sections from control and experimental flies in one preparation, we use the 'collar' method for paraffin sections. Neurodegeneration is then assessed by measuring the size and/or number of vacuoles that have developed in the fly brain. This can either be done by focusing on a specific region of interest or by analyzing the entire brain by obtaining serial sections that span the complete head. Therefore, this method allows one to measure not only severe degeneration but also relatively mild phenotypes that are only detectable in a few sections, as occurs during normal aging.

AB - Progressive neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) are an increasing threat to human health worldwide. Although mammalian models have provided important insights into the underlying mechanisms of pathogenicity, the complexity of mammalian systems together with their high costs are limiting their use. Therefore, the simple but well-established Drosophila model-system provides an alternative for investigating the molecular pathways that are affected in these diseases. Besides behavioral deficits, neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by histological phenotypes such as neuronal death and axonopathy. To quantify neuronal degeneration and to determine how it is affected by genetic and environmental factors, we use a histological approach that is based on measuring the vacuoles in adult fly brains. To minimize the effects of systematic error and to directly compare sections from control and experimental flies in one preparation, we use the 'collar' method for paraffin sections. Neurodegeneration is then assessed by measuring the size and/or number of vacuoles that have developed in the fly brain. This can either be done by focusing on a specific region of interest or by analyzing the entire brain by obtaining serial sections that span the complete head. Therefore, this method allows one to measure not only severe degeneration but also relatively mild phenotypes that are only detectable in a few sections, as occurs during normal aging.

KW - Adult nervous system

KW - Degenerative diseases

KW - Drosophila

KW - Histology

KW - Issue 118

KW - Neurobiology

KW - Neuroscience

KW - Paraffin sections

KW - Vacuoles

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008604268&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008604268&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3791/54809

DO - 10.3791/54809

M3 - Article

C2 - 28060320

AN - SCOPUS:85008604268

VL - 2016

JO - Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE

JF - Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE

SN - 1940-087X

IS - 118

M1 - e54809

ER -