Management of long-term failure after colon interposition for benign disease

John S. Domreis, Blair A. Jobe, Ralph W. Aye, Karen Deveney, Brett Sheppard, Clifford Deveney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess causes and treatment of late failures of colon interposition. Methods: We reviewed the charts of 6 patients who underwent one or more revisions of a colonic interposition at a mean of 16 years after colon interposition (CI). Results: Symptoms of problems with the CI were dysphagia (67%), regurgitation (67%), pneumonia (40%), and chest pain (33%). Findings that accounted for failure were colonic redundancy (67%), and gastrocolonic reflux (50%). Approach was resection of redundant colon or management of reflux. Four patients underwent segmental resection of the colon preserving blood supply. Three patients had gastric resection or diversion of bile and acid for management of reflux. Treatment was successful in all patients. Conclusion: Late failure of colon interposition is secondary to conduit redundancy and severe reflux. Resection of redundant colon will correct colonic redundancy. Gastric resection or diversion of bile and acid corrects gastrocolonic reflux.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)544-546
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume183
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Colon
Bile Acids and Salts
Stomach
Deglutition Disorders
Treatment Failure
Chest Pain
Pneumonia

Keywords

  • Colon interposition
  • Esophageal replacement
  • Long-term outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Management of long-term failure after colon interposition for benign disease. / Domreis, John S.; Jobe, Blair A.; Aye, Ralph W.; Deveney, Karen; Sheppard, Brett; Deveney, Clifford.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 183, No. 5, 2002, p. 544-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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