Mammography decision making in older women with a breast cancer family history

Karen E. Greco, Lillian Nail, Judy Kendall, Juliana Cartwright, Deborah Messecar

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose: This study's purpose is to describe and explain how women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer make screening mammography decisions. Design: A qualitative design based on grounded theory. This purposeful sample consisted of 23 women 55 years of age or older with one more first-degree relatives diagnosed with breast cancer. Method: Open-ended interviews were conducted with 23 women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer using a semistructured interview guide. Transcribed interview data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis to identify the conditions, actions, and consequences associated with participant's screening mammography decision making. Findings: Women reported becoming aware of their breast cancer risk usually due to a triggering event such as having a family member diagnosed with breast cancer, resulting in women "guarding against cancer." Women's actions included having mammograms, getting health check-ups, having healthy behaviors, and being optimistic. Most women reported extraordinary faith in mammography, often ignoring negative mammogram information. A negative mammogram gave women peace of mind and assurance that breast cancer was not present. Being called back for additional mammograms caused worry, especially with delayed results. Conclusions: The "guarding against cancer" theory needs to be tested in other at-risk populations and ultimately used to test strategies that promote cancer screening decision making and the adoption of screening behaviors in those at increased risk for developing cancer. Clinical Relevance: Women 55 years of age and older with a breast cancer family history need timely mammogram results, mammography reminders, and psychosocial support when undergoing a mammography recall or other follow-up tests.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)348-356
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Nursing Scholarship
    Volume42
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 2010

    Fingerprint

    Mammography
    Decision Making
    Breast Neoplasms
    Interviews
    Early Detection of Cancer
    Neoplasms
    Health

    Keywords

    • Breast cancer
    • Breast cancer screening
    • Breast screening
    • Decision making
    • Family history
    • Grounded theory
    • Mammography
    • Qualitative research

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Nursing(all)

    Cite this

    Mammography decision making in older women with a breast cancer family history. / Greco, Karen E.; Nail, Lillian; Kendall, Judy; Cartwright, Juliana; Messecar, Deborah.

    In: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, Vol. 42, No. 3, 09.2010, p. 348-356.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{0ff25ae30e494662a139ca41ee2ada15,
    title = "Mammography decision making in older women with a breast cancer family history",
    abstract = "Purpose: This study's purpose is to describe and explain how women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer make screening mammography decisions. Design: A qualitative design based on grounded theory. This purposeful sample consisted of 23 women 55 years of age or older with one more first-degree relatives diagnosed with breast cancer. Method: Open-ended interviews were conducted with 23 women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer using a semistructured interview guide. Transcribed interview data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis to identify the conditions, actions, and consequences associated with participant's screening mammography decision making. Findings: Women reported becoming aware of their breast cancer risk usually due to a triggering event such as having a family member diagnosed with breast cancer, resulting in women {"}guarding against cancer.{"} Women's actions included having mammograms, getting health check-ups, having healthy behaviors, and being optimistic. Most women reported extraordinary faith in mammography, often ignoring negative mammogram information. A negative mammogram gave women peace of mind and assurance that breast cancer was not present. Being called back for additional mammograms caused worry, especially with delayed results. Conclusions: The {"}guarding against cancer{"} theory needs to be tested in other at-risk populations and ultimately used to test strategies that promote cancer screening decision making and the adoption of screening behaviors in those at increased risk for developing cancer. Clinical Relevance: Women 55 years of age and older with a breast cancer family history need timely mammogram results, mammography reminders, and psychosocial support when undergoing a mammography recall or other follow-up tests.",
    keywords = "Breast cancer, Breast cancer screening, Breast screening, Decision making, Family history, Grounded theory, Mammography, Qualitative research",
    author = "Greco, {Karen E.} and Lillian Nail and Judy Kendall and Juliana Cartwright and Deborah Messecar",
    year = "2010",
    month = "9",
    doi = "10.1111/j.1547-5069.2010.01335.x",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "42",
    pages = "348--356",
    journal = "Journal of Nursing Scholarship",
    issn = "1527-6546",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
    number = "3",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Mammography decision making in older women with a breast cancer family history

    AU - Greco, Karen E.

    AU - Nail, Lillian

    AU - Kendall, Judy

    AU - Cartwright, Juliana

    AU - Messecar, Deborah

    PY - 2010/9

    Y1 - 2010/9

    N2 - Purpose: This study's purpose is to describe and explain how women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer make screening mammography decisions. Design: A qualitative design based on grounded theory. This purposeful sample consisted of 23 women 55 years of age or older with one more first-degree relatives diagnosed with breast cancer. Method: Open-ended interviews were conducted with 23 women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer using a semistructured interview guide. Transcribed interview data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis to identify the conditions, actions, and consequences associated with participant's screening mammography decision making. Findings: Women reported becoming aware of their breast cancer risk usually due to a triggering event such as having a family member diagnosed with breast cancer, resulting in women "guarding against cancer." Women's actions included having mammograms, getting health check-ups, having healthy behaviors, and being optimistic. Most women reported extraordinary faith in mammography, often ignoring negative mammogram information. A negative mammogram gave women peace of mind and assurance that breast cancer was not present. Being called back for additional mammograms caused worry, especially with delayed results. Conclusions: The "guarding against cancer" theory needs to be tested in other at-risk populations and ultimately used to test strategies that promote cancer screening decision making and the adoption of screening behaviors in those at increased risk for developing cancer. Clinical Relevance: Women 55 years of age and older with a breast cancer family history need timely mammogram results, mammography reminders, and psychosocial support when undergoing a mammography recall or other follow-up tests.

    AB - Purpose: This study's purpose is to describe and explain how women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer make screening mammography decisions. Design: A qualitative design based on grounded theory. This purposeful sample consisted of 23 women 55 years of age or older with one more first-degree relatives diagnosed with breast cancer. Method: Open-ended interviews were conducted with 23 women 55 years of age and older with a family history of breast cancer using a semistructured interview guide. Transcribed interview data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis to identify the conditions, actions, and consequences associated with participant's screening mammography decision making. Findings: Women reported becoming aware of their breast cancer risk usually due to a triggering event such as having a family member diagnosed with breast cancer, resulting in women "guarding against cancer." Women's actions included having mammograms, getting health check-ups, having healthy behaviors, and being optimistic. Most women reported extraordinary faith in mammography, often ignoring negative mammogram information. A negative mammogram gave women peace of mind and assurance that breast cancer was not present. Being called back for additional mammograms caused worry, especially with delayed results. Conclusions: The "guarding against cancer" theory needs to be tested in other at-risk populations and ultimately used to test strategies that promote cancer screening decision making and the adoption of screening behaviors in those at increased risk for developing cancer. Clinical Relevance: Women 55 years of age and older with a breast cancer family history need timely mammogram results, mammography reminders, and psychosocial support when undergoing a mammography recall or other follow-up tests.

    KW - Breast cancer

    KW - Breast cancer screening

    KW - Breast screening

    KW - Decision making

    KW - Family history

    KW - Grounded theory

    KW - Mammography

    KW - Qualitative research

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956107514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956107514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2010.01335.x

    DO - 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2010.01335.x

    M3 - Article

    VL - 42

    SP - 348

    EP - 356

    JO - Journal of Nursing Scholarship

    JF - Journal of Nursing Scholarship

    SN - 1527-6546

    IS - 3

    ER -