Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine — terrific test or tar baby?

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Back pain affects nearly half of all adults during a given year, and about two thirds of adults have back pain at some time in their lives. It is the second leading reason for visits to physicians in the United States and the leading cause of work-related disability1. Unfortunately, the cause of back problems is often obscure, in part because symptoms, anatomical findings, and imaging results may be only loosely associated. Thus, up to 85 percent of patients with low back pain cannot be given a definitive diagnosis2. This diagnostic uncertainty contributes to the large number of fads.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-116
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume331
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 14 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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