Ma1, a novel neuron- and testis-specific protein, is recognized by the serum of patients with paraneoplastic neurological disorders

Josep Dalmau, Sakir Gultekin, Raymond Voltz, Rita Hoard, Thomas DesChamps, Casilda Balmaceda, Tracy Batchelor, Elizabeth Gerstner, Joseph Eichen, Jennifer Frennier, Jerome B. Posner, Myrna R. Rosenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

179 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The identification of antineuronal antibodies has facilitated the diagnosis of paraneoplastic neurological disorders and the early detection of the associated tumours. It has also led to the cloning of possibly important neuron-specific proteins. In this study we wanted to identify novel antineuronal antibodies in the sera of patients with paraneoplastic neurological disorders and to clone the corresponding antigens. Serological studies of 1705 sera from patients with suspected paraneoplastic neurological disorders resulted in the identification of four patients with antibodies that reacted with 37 and 40 kDa neuronal proteins (anti-Ma antibodies). Three patients had brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction, and one had dysphagia and motor weakness. Autopsy of two patients showed loss of Purkinje cells, Bergmann gliosis and deep cerebellar white matter inflammatory infiltrates. Extensive neuronal degeneration, gliosis and infiltrates mainly composed of CD8+ T cells were also found in the brainstem of one patient. In normal human and rat tissues, the anti-Ma antibodies reacted exclusively with neurons and with testicular germ cells; the reaction was mainly with subnuclear elements (including the nucleoli) and to a lesser degree the cytoplasm. Anti-Ma antibodies also reacted with the cancers (breast, colon and parotid) available from three anti-Ma patients, but not with 66 other tumours of varying histological types. Preincubation of tissues with any of the anti-Ma sera abrogated the reactivity of the other anti-Ma immunoglobulins. Probing of a human complementary DNA library with anti-Ma serum resulted in the cloning of a gene that encodes a novel 37 kDa protein (Ma1). Recombinant Ma1 was specifically recognized by the four anti-Ma sera but not by 337 control sera, including those from 52 normal individuals, 179 cancer patients without paraneoplastic neurological symptoms, 96 patients with paraneoplastic syndromes and 10 patients with non-cancer-related neurological disorders. The expression of Ma1 mRNA is highly restricted to the brain and testis. Subsequent analysis suggested that Ma1 is likely to be a phosphoprotein. Our study demonstrates that some patients with paraneoplastic neurological disorders develop antibodies against Ma1, a new member of an expanding family of 'brain/testis' proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-39
Number of pages13
JournalBrain
Volume122
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nervous System Diseases
Testis
Neurons
Serum
Proteins
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Gliosis
Antibodies
Brain Stem
Organism Cloning
Parotid Neoplasms
Cerebellar Diseases
Paraneoplastic Syndromes
Neoplasms
Purkinje Cells
Phosphoproteins
Brain
Deglutition Disorders
Gene Library
Germ Cells

Keywords

  • Antineuronal antibody
  • Brain/testis proteins
  • Cerebellar degeneration
  • Ma1
  • Paraneoplastic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Dalmau, J., Gultekin, S., Voltz, R., Hoard, R., DesChamps, T., Balmaceda, C., ... Rosenfeld, M. R. (1999). Ma1, a novel neuron- and testis-specific protein, is recognized by the serum of patients with paraneoplastic neurological disorders. Brain, 122(1), 27-39. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/122.1.27

Ma1, a novel neuron- and testis-specific protein, is recognized by the serum of patients with paraneoplastic neurological disorders. / Dalmau, Josep; Gultekin, Sakir; Voltz, Raymond; Hoard, Rita; DesChamps, Thomas; Balmaceda, Casilda; Batchelor, Tracy; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Eichen, Joseph; Frennier, Jennifer; Posner, Jerome B.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

In: Brain, Vol. 122, No. 1, 01.1999, p. 27-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dalmau, J, Gultekin, S, Voltz, R, Hoard, R, DesChamps, T, Balmaceda, C, Batchelor, T, Gerstner, E, Eichen, J, Frennier, J, Posner, JB & Rosenfeld, MR 1999, 'Ma1, a novel neuron- and testis-specific protein, is recognized by the serum of patients with paraneoplastic neurological disorders', Brain, vol. 122, no. 1, pp. 27-39. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/122.1.27
Dalmau, Josep ; Gultekin, Sakir ; Voltz, Raymond ; Hoard, Rita ; DesChamps, Thomas ; Balmaceda, Casilda ; Batchelor, Tracy ; Gerstner, Elizabeth ; Eichen, Joseph ; Frennier, Jennifer ; Posner, Jerome B. ; Rosenfeld, Myrna R. / Ma1, a novel neuron- and testis-specific protein, is recognized by the serum of patients with paraneoplastic neurological disorders. In: Brain. 1999 ; Vol. 122, No. 1. pp. 27-39.
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