Lung tumor promotion by curcumin

Stephanie T. Dance-Barnes, Nancy D. Kock, Joseph E. Moore, Elaine Lin, Libyadda J. Mosley, Ralph B. D'Agostino, Thomas P. Mccoy, Alan J. Townsend, Mark Steven Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Curcumin exhibits anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity and is being tested in clinical trials as a chemopreventive agent for colon cancer. Curcumin's chemopreventive activity was tested in a transgenic mouse model of lung cancer that expresses the human Ki-rasG12C allele in a doxycycline (DOX) inducible and lung-specific manner. The effects of curcumin were compared with the lung tumor promoter, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and the lung cancer chemopreventive agent, sulindac. Treatment of DOX-induced mice with dietary curcumin increased tumor multiplicity (36.3 ± 0.9 versus 24.3 ± 0.2) and progression to later stage lesions, results which were similar to animals that were co-treated with DOX/BHT. Microscopic examination showed that the percentage of lung lesions that were adenomas and adenocarcinomas increased to 66% in DOX/BHT, 66% in DOX/curcumin and 49% in DOX/BHT/curcumin-treated groups relative to DOX only treated mice (19%). Immunohistochemical analysis also showed increased evidence of inflammation in DOX/BHT, DOX/curcumin and DOX/BHT/curcumin mice relative to DOX only treated mice. In contrast, co-treatment of DOX/BHT mice with 80 p.p.m. of sulindac inhibited the progression of lung lesions and reduced the inflammation. Lung tissue from DOX/curcumin-treated mice demonstrated a significant increase (33%; P = 0.01) in oxidative damage, as assessed by the levels of carbonyl protein formation, relative to DOX-treated control mice after 1 week on the curcumin diet. These results suggest that curcumin may exhibit organ-specific effects to enhance reactive oxygen species formation in the damaged lung epithelium of smokers and ex-smokers. Ongoing clinical trials thus may need to exclude smokers and ex-smokers in chemopreventive trials of curcumin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1016-1023
Number of pages8
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Curcumin
Doxycycline
Butylated Hydroxytoluene
Lung
Neoplasms
Sulindac
Lung Neoplasms
Protein Carbonylation
Clinical Trials
Inflammation
Carcinogens
Adenoma
Colonic Neoplasms
Transgenic Mice
Reactive Oxygen Species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Dance-Barnes, S. T., Kock, N. D., Moore, J. E., Lin, E., Mosley, L. J., D'Agostino, R. B., ... Miller, M. S. (2009). Lung tumor promotion by curcumin. Carcinogenesis, 30(6), 1016-1023. https://doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp082

Lung tumor promotion by curcumin. / Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Moore, Joseph E.; Lin, Elaine; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Mccoy, Thomas P.; Townsend, Alan J.; Miller, Mark Steven.

In: Carcinogenesis, Vol. 30, No. 6, 2009, p. 1016-1023.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dance-Barnes, ST, Kock, ND, Moore, JE, Lin, E, Mosley, LJ, D'Agostino, RB, Mccoy, TP, Townsend, AJ & Miller, MS 2009, 'Lung tumor promotion by curcumin', Carcinogenesis, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 1016-1023. https://doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp082
Dance-Barnes ST, Kock ND, Moore JE, Lin E, Mosley LJ, D'Agostino RB et al. Lung tumor promotion by curcumin. Carcinogenesis. 2009;30(6):1016-1023. https://doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp082
Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T. ; Kock, Nancy D. ; Moore, Joseph E. ; Lin, Elaine ; Mosley, Libyadda J. ; D'Agostino, Ralph B. ; Mccoy, Thomas P. ; Townsend, Alan J. ; Miller, Mark Steven. / Lung tumor promotion by curcumin. In: Carcinogenesis. 2009 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 1016-1023.
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