Low coherence interferometry of the cochlear partition

N. Choudhury, S. L. Jacques, S. Mathew, F. Chen, J. Zheng, A. L. Nuttall

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

An optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system operating at 1310nm wavelength was used to image the organ of Corti. The spatial resolution of the system was ~13?m. The reflectivity of light intensity for the organ of Corti was ~10-5 (a mirror defines a reflectivity of 1.00). Operating the system as a low-coherence interferometer allowed us to measure localized vibration of the basilar membrane in the organ of Corti, driven mechanically with a piezo stack coupled to the sample chamber. We were able to detect vibrational signal at 16kHz from three different locations in the organ of Corti. The chamber was vibrated by ±~1nm. The normalized detected signal (vibrational signal amplitude divided by the intensity of reflected light) from all three locations were approximately constant for equal amount of vibration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAuditory Mechanisms
Subtitle of host publicationProcesses and Models - Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium
EditorsAlfred L. Nuttall, Tianying Ren, Peter Gillespie, Karl Grosh, Egbert de Boer
PublisherWorld Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd
Pages111-112
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9812568247, 9789812568243
StatePublished - 2005
Event9th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop on Auditory Mechanisms: Processes and Models, MoH 2005 - Portland, United States
Duration: Jul 23 2005Jul 28 2005

Publication series

NameAuditory Mechanisms: Processes and Models - Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium

Conference

Conference9th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop on Auditory Mechanisms: Processes and Models, MoH 2005
CountryUnited States
CityPortland
Period7/23/057/28/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biomedical Engineering

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