Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability are rare in sporadic dedifferentiated liposarcoma

A study of 43 well-characterized cases

Jessica Davis, James P. Grenert, Andrew E. Horvai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context.-Defects in mismatch repair proteins have been identified in Lynch syndrome-associated liposarcomas, as well as in rare sporadic sarcomas. However, it is unclear if mismatch repair defects have a role in sarcoma tumorigenesis. Microsatellite instability is a surrogate marker of mismatch repair defects. Objectives.-To determine whether sporadic dedifferentiated liposarcomas display microsatellite instability and, if so, to evaluate whether such instability differs between the lipogenic and nonlipogenic components of these tumors. Design.-The diagnoses of conventional dedifferentiated liposarcoma were confirmed by a combination of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular studies. Standard fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction, including 5 mononucleotide microsatellite markers (BAT25, BAT26, NR21, NR24, and MONO27), as well as 2 pentanucleotide repeat markers (Penta C and Penta D), was used to test for instability and loss of heterozygosity. Results.-We demonstrated only a single case (1 of 43) with microsatellite instability at one mononucleotide marker. No sarcomas showed high-level microsatellite instability. However, loss of heterozygosity at the pentanucleotide markers was observed in 8 of 43 cases. The presence of loss of heterozygosity was overrepresented in the nonlipogenic (dedifferentiated) components compared with the paired lipogenic (well differentiated) components. Conclusions.-Mismatch repair defects do not contribute to sporadic dedifferentiated liposarcoma tumorigenesis. Whether the observed loss of heterozygosity drives tumorigenesis in liposarcoma, for example by affecting tumor suppressor or cell cycle regulator genes, remains to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)823-827
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume138
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Liposarcoma
Microsatellite Instability
Loss of Heterozygosity
DNA Mismatch Repair
Sarcoma
Rubiaceae
Carcinogenesis
Microsatellite Repeats
Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Neoplasms
cdc Genes
Regulator Genes
Neoplasms
Biomarkers
Fluorescence
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Cite this

Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability are rare in sporadic dedifferentiated liposarcoma : A study of 43 well-characterized cases. / Davis, Jessica; Grenert, James P.; Horvai, Andrew E.

In: Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 138, No. 6, 01.01.2014, p. 823-827.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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