Longitudinal association of delta activity at sleep onset with cognitive and affective function in community-dwelling older adults

Makoto Kawai, Sherry A. Beaudreau, Christine E. Gould, Nathan Hantke, Isabelle Cotto, Josh T. Jordan, Rayna B. Hirst, Ruth O'Hara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This investigation sought to determine whether delta activity at sleep onset (DASO) in the sleep electroencephalography of older adults represents normal variation or is associated with clinical pathology. To this end, we examined its longitudinal associations with cognitive and affective function in older adults without dementia. Methods: Participants were 153 community-dwelling older adults without dementia. We evaluated polysomnography (PSG), cognitive performance, and affective function at four time points: baseline, 12, 24, and 36 months. All participants completed PSG and measures of global cognition, delayed verbal memory, information processing speed, attention, inhibition, verbal naming, visuospatial ability, and measures of anxiety and depression. DASO was defined as sequences of rhythmic anterior delta activity on PSG in the transition from awake to sleep during the baseline assessment (Figure). Results: At the baseline, 83 women and 70 men, mean age 71.3 ± 0.6 years participated and 19.6% of participants exhibited DASO. Age, years of education, gender, and body mass index did not differ according to DASO status. Linear mixed modeling showed that the presence of DASO was actually associated with lower levels of anxiety and depression. Further, participants with DASO, versus those without DASO, exhibited a trend towards better cognitive performance over time, although none of these associations reached statistical significance. Conclusions: Whereas DASO was associated with better affective function, no significant association was found between DASO and cognitive change over time. These longitudinal findings support the view that the presence of DASO in healthy older adults represents normal variation rather than pathological aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1124-1135
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Independent Living
Cognition
Sleep
Polysomnography
Dementia
Anxiety
Repression (Psychology)
Depression
Clinical Pathology
Aptitude
Automatic Data Processing
Electroencephalography
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • affective function
  • cognition
  • delta activity at sleep onset

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Longitudinal association of delta activity at sleep onset with cognitive and affective function in community-dwelling older adults. / Kawai, Makoto; Beaudreau, Sherry A.; Gould, Christine E.; Hantke, Nathan; Cotto, Isabelle; Jordan, Josh T.; Hirst, Rayna B.; O'Hara, Ruth.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 31, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1124-1135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawai, Makoto ; Beaudreau, Sherry A. ; Gould, Christine E. ; Hantke, Nathan ; Cotto, Isabelle ; Jordan, Josh T. ; Hirst, Rayna B. ; O'Hara, Ruth. / Longitudinal association of delta activity at sleep onset with cognitive and affective function in community-dwelling older adults. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 10. pp. 1124-1135.
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