Long-term use of supplemental multivitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, and folate does not reduce the risk of lung cancer

Christopher G. Slatore, Alyson J. Littman, David H. Au, Jessie A. Satia, Emily White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rationale: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Although supplements are used by half the population, limited information is available about their specific effect on lung cancer risk. Objectives: Toexplore the associationof supplemental multivitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, and folate with incident lung cancer. Methods: Prospective cohort of 77,721 men and women aged 50-76 years from Washington State in the VITAL (VITamins And Lifestyle) study. Cases were identified through the Seattle-Puget Sound SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) cancer registry. Measurements and Main Results: Hazard ratios (HRs) for incident lung cancer according to 10-year average daily use of supplemental multivitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, and folate. A total of 521 cases of lung cancer were identified. Adjusting for smoking, age, and sex, there was no inverse association with any supplement. Supplemental vitamin E was associated with a small increased risk of lung cancer (HR, 1.05 for every 100-mg/d increase in dose; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.09; P = 0.033). This risk of supplemental vitamin E was largely confined to current smokers (HR, 1.11 for every 100-mg/d increase; 95% CI, 1.03-1.19; P < 0.01) and was greatest for non-small cell lung cancer (HR, 1.07 for every 100-mg/d increase; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12; P = 0.004). Conclusions: Supplemental multivitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, and folate were not associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer. Supplemental vitamin E was associated with a small increased risk. Patients should be counseled against using these supplements to prevent lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)524-530
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
Volume177
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bronchial neoplasm
  • Diet
  • Dietary supplements
  • Public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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