Long-term survival after postinfarction bypass operation

Early versus late operation

H. Storm Floten, Aftab Ahmad, Jeffrey S. Swanson, James A. Wood, Richard D. Chapman, Cindy L. Fessler, Albert Starr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study of 832 patients operated on within 30 days of infarction from 1974 to 1987 has resulted in 2,388 patient-years (maximum, 14 years) of prospectivey acquired follow-up. This study excludes 74 parents in whom cardiogenic shock was the indication for operation. Five-year survival (± standard error) was 84% ± 2%, 85% ± 1%, and 90% ± 1%, and 10-year survival was 71% ± 4%, 68% ± 1%, and 78% ± 1% for patients with acute infarction, remote infarction, and no previous infarction, respectively. Age and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure significantly affected long-term survival for patients with acute infarction by both univariate and multivariate analysis. For patients aged less than 65 years, the 5-year and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 89% ± 2% and 80% ± 4%, compared with 75% ± 3% and 58% ± 9%, respectively, for patients aged more trun 65 years. The survival percentages were 89% ± 2% and 75% ± 6% for patients with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure less than 15 mm Hg compared with 77% ± 5% and 67% ± 7% for patients with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure greater than 15 mm Hg. Operative mortality was 7.6% for patients operated on within 24 hours, compared with 4.1% for patients operated on between 2 and 30 days after infarction. Ten-year survival was similar (about 70%) for all timing groups. Based on these long-term results, there appears to be little to gain by delaying coronary artery bypass grafting, when indicated, after infarction occurs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)757-763
Number of pages7
JournalThe Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

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Infarction
Survival
Blood Pressure
Cardiogenic Shock
Coronary Artery Bypass
Multivariate Analysis
Survival Rate
Parents
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Floten, H. S., Ahmad, A., Swanson, J. S., Wood, J. A., Chapman, R. D., Fessler, C. L., & Starr, A. (1989). Long-term survival after postinfarction bypass operation: Early versus late operation. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 48(6), 757-763. https://doi.org/10.1016/0003-4975(89)90666-8

Long-term survival after postinfarction bypass operation : Early versus late operation. / Floten, H. Storm; Ahmad, Aftab; Swanson, Jeffrey S.; Wood, James A.; Chapman, Richard D.; Fessler, Cindy L.; Starr, Albert.

In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 48, No. 6, 1989, p. 757-763.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Floten, HS, Ahmad, A, Swanson, JS, Wood, JA, Chapman, RD, Fessler, CL & Starr, A 1989, 'Long-term survival after postinfarction bypass operation: Early versus late operation', The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol. 48, no. 6, pp. 757-763. https://doi.org/10.1016/0003-4975(89)90666-8
Floten, H. Storm ; Ahmad, Aftab ; Swanson, Jeffrey S. ; Wood, James A. ; Chapman, Richard D. ; Fessler, Cindy L. ; Starr, Albert. / Long-term survival after postinfarction bypass operation : Early versus late operation. In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 1989 ; Vol. 48, No. 6. pp. 757-763.
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