Long-term estrogen therapy worsens the behavioral and neuropathological consequences of chronic brain inflammation

L. K. Marriott, B. Hauss-Wegrzyniak, R. S. Benton, P. D. Vraniak, G. L. Wenk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by chronic neuroinflammation and occurs with greater incidence in postmenopausal women. The increased incidence may be delayed by estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The authors investigated the interaction of chronic ERT and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation in the female rat. Ovariectomy did not impair water maze performance; however, addition of chronic ERT or neuroinflammation resulted in an impairment that became exacerbated by the simultaneous occurrence of both conditions. Chronic LPS activated microglia, which was not reduced by ERT. Intact females receiving LPS infusion were not impaired in the water maze and had significantly fewer activated microglia. Results suggest that chronic ERT in postmenopausal women may exacerbate the memory impairment induced by the chronic neuroinflammation associated with AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)902-911
Number of pages10
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume116
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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