Long-term care needs of hospitalized persons with AIDS - A prospective cohort study

Wayne C. McCormick, Thomas S. Inui, Richard (Rick) Deyo, Robert W. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:As the treatment for HIV infection has improved, AIDS has become a chronic disease, and the demand for long-term care has increased. The authors studied a cohort of hospitalized persons with AIDS to determine the proportion and characteristics of AIDS patients who could appropriately be cared for in long-term care facilities with skilled nursing. Design:Prospective cohort study. Setting:Medical wards of five Seattle tertiary care hospitals. Participants:120 consecutive hospitalized persons with AIDS and their primary care physicians, nurses, and social workers. Measurements and main results:Appropriateness for long-term care was determined by the patients' physicians, nurses, and social workers. Persons with AIDS who were appropriate for long-term care constituted 32% of the cohort (38 of 120), accounting for 35% of hospital days (11 of these 38 were discharged to long-term care facilities). Four admission characteristics were independently related to appropriateness: impaired activities of daily living, diagnosis of central nervous system illness or poor cognition, living alone, and weight loss. A discriminant function correctly classified over 80% of patients for appropriateness and was developed into a predictive index for planning patient care (sensitivity =0.74, specificity =0.85). Conclusions:The authors conclude that one-third of hospitalized persons with AIDS may be appropriate for care in long-term care settings, accounting for one-third of the days AIDS patients currently spend in hospitals. These patients can be identified early in hospital stays using a simple predictive index at the bedside.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Long-Term Care
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Nurses
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Patient Care Planning
Primary Care Physicians
Tertiary Healthcare
Activities of Daily Living
Tertiary Care Centers
Cognition
HIV Infections
Weight Loss
Length of Stay
Chronic Disease
Central Nervous System
Physicians
Sensitivity and Specificity

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • long-term care
  • predictive index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Long-term care needs of hospitalized persons with AIDS - A prospective cohort study. / McCormick, Wayne C.; Inui, Thomas S.; Deyo, Richard (Rick); Wood, Robert W.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.1991, p. 27-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCormick, Wayne C. ; Inui, Thomas S. ; Deyo, Richard (Rick) ; Wood, Robert W. / Long-term care needs of hospitalized persons with AIDS - A prospective cohort study. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 27-34.
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