Long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings

A bitter pill to swallow

David Bangsberg, Edward J. Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is an important predictor of long-term treatment success. Adherence can be differentiated between early adherence challenges, that are about integrating pill-taking into daily life, and long-term adherence, where patients struggle to maintain clinical connections and interrupt clinical care and medication use. In resource-limited settings, treatment interruptions may be more useful predictors of patient outcome than pill-taking alone. Interventions that are aimed at providing support to patients and their individual challenges to prevent interruptions in treatment and care may have a greater impact over time on clinically important outcomes than interventions targeted only at pill-taking behaviours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-28
Number of pages4
JournalAntiviral Therapy
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Deglutition
Therapeutics
Patient Compliance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings : A bitter pill to swallow. / Bangsberg, David; Mills, Edward J.

In: Antiviral Therapy, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2013, p. 25-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{adc8f07b6227410d825b4fac8811ca0c,
title = "Long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: A bitter pill to swallow",
abstract = "Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is an important predictor of long-term treatment success. Adherence can be differentiated between early adherence challenges, that are about integrating pill-taking into daily life, and long-term adherence, where patients struggle to maintain clinical connections and interrupt clinical care and medication use. In resource-limited settings, treatment interruptions may be more useful predictors of patient outcome than pill-taking alone. Interventions that are aimed at providing support to patients and their individual challenges to prevent interruptions in treatment and care may have a greater impact over time on clinically important outcomes than interventions targeted only at pill-taking behaviours.",
author = "David Bangsberg and Mills, {Edward J.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.3851/IMP2536",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "25--28",
journal = "Antiviral Therapy",
issn = "1359-6535",
publisher = "International Medical Press Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings

T2 - A bitter pill to swallow

AU - Bangsberg, David

AU - Mills, Edward J.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is an important predictor of long-term treatment success. Adherence can be differentiated between early adherence challenges, that are about integrating pill-taking into daily life, and long-term adherence, where patients struggle to maintain clinical connections and interrupt clinical care and medication use. In resource-limited settings, treatment interruptions may be more useful predictors of patient outcome than pill-taking alone. Interventions that are aimed at providing support to patients and their individual challenges to prevent interruptions in treatment and care may have a greater impact over time on clinically important outcomes than interventions targeted only at pill-taking behaviours.

AB - Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is an important predictor of long-term treatment success. Adherence can be differentiated between early adherence challenges, that are about integrating pill-taking into daily life, and long-term adherence, where patients struggle to maintain clinical connections and interrupt clinical care and medication use. In resource-limited settings, treatment interruptions may be more useful predictors of patient outcome than pill-taking alone. Interventions that are aimed at providing support to patients and their individual challenges to prevent interruptions in treatment and care may have a greater impact over time on clinically important outcomes than interventions targeted only at pill-taking behaviours.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874410220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874410220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3851/IMP2536

DO - 10.3851/IMP2536

M3 - Review article

VL - 18

SP - 25

EP - 28

JO - Antiviral Therapy

JF - Antiviral Therapy

SN - 1359-6535

IS - 1

ER -