Locally recurrent rectal cancer

what the radiologist should know

Dhakshinamoorthy Ganeshan, Stephanie Nougaret, Elena Korngold, Gaiane M. Rauch, Courtney C. Moreno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite advances in surgical techniques and chemoradiation therapy, recurrent rectal cancer remains a cause of morbidity and mortality. After successful treatment of rectal cancer, patients are typically enrolled in a surveillance strategy that includes imaging as studies have shown improved prognosis when recurrent rectal cancer is detected during imaging surveillance versus based on development of symptoms. Additionally, patients who experience a complete clinical response with chemoradiation therapy may elect to enroll in a “watch-and-wait” strategy that includes imaging surveillance rather than surgical resection. Factors that increase the likelihood of recurrence, patterns of recurrence, and the imaging appearances of recurrent rectal cancer are reviewed with a focus on CT, PET CT, and MR imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAbdominal Radiology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Rectal Neoplasms
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Morbidity
Mortality
Radiologists

Keywords

  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Rectal cancer
  • Recurrent rectal cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Gastroenterology
  • Urology

Cite this

Locally recurrent rectal cancer : what the radiologist should know. / Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Nougaret, Stephanie; Korngold, Elena; Rauch, Gaiane M.; Moreno, Courtney C.

In: Abdominal Radiology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy ; Nougaret, Stephanie ; Korngold, Elena ; Rauch, Gaiane M. ; Moreno, Courtney C. / Locally recurrent rectal cancer : what the radiologist should know. In: Abdominal Radiology. 2019.
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