Localizing retrocochlear hearing loss

Barry E. Hirsch, John D. Durrant, Sertac Yetiser, Donald B. Kamerer, William Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The origin of acute/sudden hearing loss is multifactorial. The association of vestibular symptoms does not necessarily isolate the pathologic condition to the inner ear. The audiogram provides a screen for differentiating conductive from sensorineural loss but often fails to provide more localizing information. Methods: Three unusual patients with a variety of retrocochlear presentations of hearing loss are presented. Along with conventional auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing, newer auditory tests, including otoacoustic emissions and three-dimensional ABR analysis, can facilitate site-of-lesion testing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also provides graphic documentation for sources of retrocochlear hearing loss. Results: One patient had gamma-knife treatment of an arteriovenous malformation, incurring a localized lesion to the inferior colliculus contralateral to the side of hearing loss. This effectively eliminated wave V as confirmed by three-dimensional ABR analysis. A second patient with human immunodeficiency virus developed sudden complete hearing loss with retained otoacoustic emissions, confirming a retrocochlear lesion. A third patient with acute otitis media with sudden hearing loss and vertigo had an abnormal ABR and 'mass lesion' on MRI. Hearing subsequently returned to normal, as did a repeated scan. Conclusions: The unique aspects of each case of retrocochlear hearing loss and the applied auditory electrophysiologic tests are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-546
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Otology
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Retrocochlear Diseases
Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Sudden Hearing Loss
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Inferior Colliculi
Arteriovenous Malformations
Vertigo
Otitis Media
Deafness
Inner Ear
Hearing Loss
Documentation
Hearing
HIV

Keywords

  • Diagnostic tests
  • Hearing loss
  • Retrocochlear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Hirsch, B. E., Durrant, J. D., Yetiser, S., Kamerer, D. B., & Martin, W. (1996). Localizing retrocochlear hearing loss. American Journal of Otology, 17(4), 537-546.

Localizing retrocochlear hearing loss. / Hirsch, Barry E.; Durrant, John D.; Yetiser, Sertac; Kamerer, Donald B.; Martin, William.

In: American Journal of Otology, Vol. 17, No. 4, 1996, p. 537-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirsch, BE, Durrant, JD, Yetiser, S, Kamerer, DB & Martin, W 1996, 'Localizing retrocochlear hearing loss', American Journal of Otology, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 537-546.
Hirsch BE, Durrant JD, Yetiser S, Kamerer DB, Martin W. Localizing retrocochlear hearing loss. American Journal of Otology. 1996;17(4):537-546.
Hirsch, Barry E. ; Durrant, John D. ; Yetiser, Sertac ; Kamerer, Donald B. ; Martin, William. / Localizing retrocochlear hearing loss. In: American Journal of Otology. 1996 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 537-546.
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