Living systematic review

1. Introduction—the why, what, when, and how

Living Systematic Review Network

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a novel approach to systematic review updating termed “Living systematic review” (LSR): systematic reviews that are continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. LSRs may be particularly important in fields where research evidence is emerging rapidly, current evidence is uncertain, and new research may change policy or practice decisions. We hypothesize that a continual approach to updating will achieve greater currency and validity, and increase the benefits to end users, with feasible resource requirements over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-30
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume91
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Research

Keywords

  • Evidence synthesis
  • Guidelines
  • Living guidelines
  • Living systematic review
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Living systematic review : 1. Introduction—the why, what, when, and how. / Living Systematic Review Network.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 91, 01.11.2017, p. 23-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Living Systematic Review Network. / Living systematic review : 1. Introduction—the why, what, when, and how. In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. 2017 ; Vol. 91. pp. 23-30.
@article{14113ca4b7de4855b8038fba40416ae1,
title = "Living systematic review: 1. Introduction—the why, what, when, and how",
abstract = "Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a novel approach to systematic review updating termed “Living systematic review” (LSR): systematic reviews that are continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. LSRs may be particularly important in fields where research evidence is emerging rapidly, current evidence is uncertain, and new research may change policy or practice decisions. We hypothesize that a continual approach to updating will achieve greater currency and validity, and increase the benefits to end users, with feasible resource requirements over time.",
keywords = "Evidence synthesis, Guidelines, Living guidelines, Living systematic review, Systematic review",
author = "{Living Systematic Review Network} and Elliott, {Julian H.} and Anneliese Synnot and Tari Turner and Mark Simmonds and Akl, {Elie A.} and Steve McDonald and Georgia Salanti and Joerg Meerpohl and Harriet MacLehose and John Hilton and David Tovey and Ian Shemilt and James Thomas and Thomas Agoritsas and John Hilton and Caroline Perron and Elie Akl and Rebecca Hodder and Charlotte Pestridge and Lauren Albrecht and Tanya Horsley and Joanne Platt and Rebecca Armstrong and Nguyen, {Phi Hung} and Robert Plovnick and Anneliese Arno and Noah Ivers and Gail Quinn and Agnes Au and Renea Johnston and Gabriel Rada and Matthew Bagg and Arwel Jones and Philippe Ravaud and Catherine Boden and Lara Kahale and Bernt Richter and Isabelle Boisvert and Homa Keshavarz and Rebecca Ryan and Linn Brandt and Kolakowsky-Hayner, {Stephanie A.} and Dina Salama and Alexandra Brazinova and Nagraj, {Sumanth Kumbargere} and Georgia Salanti and Rachelle Buchbinder and Toby Lasserson and Roger Chou and Mark Helfand",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "91",
pages = "23--30",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Epidemiology",
issn = "0895-4356",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Living systematic review

T2 - 1. Introduction—the why, what, when, and how

AU - Living Systematic Review Network

AU - Elliott, Julian H.

AU - Synnot, Anneliese

AU - Turner, Tari

AU - Simmonds, Mark

AU - Akl, Elie A.

AU - McDonald, Steve

AU - Salanti, Georgia

AU - Meerpohl, Joerg

AU - MacLehose, Harriet

AU - Hilton, John

AU - Tovey, David

AU - Shemilt, Ian

AU - Thomas, James

AU - Agoritsas, Thomas

AU - Hilton, John

AU - Perron, Caroline

AU - Akl, Elie

AU - Hodder, Rebecca

AU - Pestridge, Charlotte

AU - Albrecht, Lauren

AU - Horsley, Tanya

AU - Platt, Joanne

AU - Armstrong, Rebecca

AU - Nguyen, Phi Hung

AU - Plovnick, Robert

AU - Arno, Anneliese

AU - Ivers, Noah

AU - Quinn, Gail

AU - Au, Agnes

AU - Johnston, Renea

AU - Rada, Gabriel

AU - Bagg, Matthew

AU - Jones, Arwel

AU - Ravaud, Philippe

AU - Boden, Catherine

AU - Kahale, Lara

AU - Richter, Bernt

AU - Boisvert, Isabelle

AU - Keshavarz, Homa

AU - Ryan, Rebecca

AU - Brandt, Linn

AU - Kolakowsky-Hayner, Stephanie A.

AU - Salama, Dina

AU - Brazinova, Alexandra

AU - Nagraj, Sumanth Kumbargere

AU - Salanti, Georgia

AU - Buchbinder, Rachelle

AU - Lasserson, Toby

AU - Chou, Roger

AU - Helfand, Mark

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a novel approach to systematic review updating termed “Living systematic review” (LSR): systematic reviews that are continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. LSRs may be particularly important in fields where research evidence is emerging rapidly, current evidence is uncertain, and new research may change policy or practice decisions. We hypothesize that a continual approach to updating will achieve greater currency and validity, and increase the benefits to end users, with feasible resource requirements over time.

AB - Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a novel approach to systematic review updating termed “Living systematic review” (LSR): systematic reviews that are continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. LSRs may be particularly important in fields where research evidence is emerging rapidly, current evidence is uncertain, and new research may change policy or practice decisions. We hypothesize that a continual approach to updating will achieve greater currency and validity, and increase the benefits to end users, with feasible resource requirements over time.

KW - Evidence synthesis

KW - Guidelines

KW - Living guidelines

KW - Living systematic review

KW - Systematic review

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85028993474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85028993474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.010

M3 - Review article

VL - 91

SP - 23

EP - 30

JO - Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

JF - Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

SN - 0895-4356

ER -