Liver repopulation for the treatment of metabolic diseases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Orthotopic liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for several inborn errors of metabolism. Unfortunately, the supply of donor organs is limiting and therefore many patients cannot benefit from this therapy. In contrast, hepatocyte transplantation could potentially overcome the shortage in donor livers by use of cells from a single donor for multiple recipients. In classic hepatocyte transplantation, however, only 1% of the liver mass or less can be replaced by donor cells. Recently, though, it has been shown in animal models that >90% of host hepatocytes can be replaced by a small number of transplanted donor cells in a process we term 'therapeutic liver repopulation'. This phenomenon is analogous to repopulation of the haematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Liver repopulation occurs when transplanted cells have a growth advantage in the setting of damage to recipient liver cells. It has been discovered that transplanted cells from extrahepatic sources such as the adult pancreas or bone marrow can also be used for liver repopulation. Because bone marrow donors are widely available, this finding raises the hope of therapeutic application of these cells in the future. Here, the current knowledge regarding therapeutic liver repopulation and the hopeful implications for treatment of liver diseases will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-244
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Inherited Metabolic Disease
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Metabolic Diseases
Tissue Donors
Liver
Hepatocytes
Therapeutics
Transplantation
Bone Marrow
Hematopoietic System
Inborn Errors Metabolism
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Liver Transplantation
Liver Diseases
Pancreas
Animal Models
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Liver repopulation for the treatment of metabolic diseases. / Grompe, Markus.

In: Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, Vol. 24, No. 2, 2001, p. 231-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e0ad53632a20491bbcc4c1ba3e3e79a6,
title = "Liver repopulation for the treatment of metabolic diseases",
abstract = "Orthotopic liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for several inborn errors of metabolism. Unfortunately, the supply of donor organs is limiting and therefore many patients cannot benefit from this therapy. In contrast, hepatocyte transplantation could potentially overcome the shortage in donor livers by use of cells from a single donor for multiple recipients. In classic hepatocyte transplantation, however, only 1{\%} of the liver mass or less can be replaced by donor cells. Recently, though, it has been shown in animal models that >90{\%} of host hepatocytes can be replaced by a small number of transplanted donor cells in a process we term 'therapeutic liver repopulation'. This phenomenon is analogous to repopulation of the haematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Liver repopulation occurs when transplanted cells have a growth advantage in the setting of damage to recipient liver cells. It has been discovered that transplanted cells from extrahepatic sources such as the adult pancreas or bone marrow can also be used for liver repopulation. Because bone marrow donors are widely available, this finding raises the hope of therapeutic application of these cells in the future. Here, the current knowledge regarding therapeutic liver repopulation and the hopeful implications for treatment of liver diseases will be discussed.",
author = "Markus Grompe",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1023/A:1010375203539",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "231--244",
journal = "Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease",
issn = "0141-8955",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Liver repopulation for the treatment of metabolic diseases

AU - Grompe, Markus

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Orthotopic liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for several inborn errors of metabolism. Unfortunately, the supply of donor organs is limiting and therefore many patients cannot benefit from this therapy. In contrast, hepatocyte transplantation could potentially overcome the shortage in donor livers by use of cells from a single donor for multiple recipients. In classic hepatocyte transplantation, however, only 1% of the liver mass or less can be replaced by donor cells. Recently, though, it has been shown in animal models that >90% of host hepatocytes can be replaced by a small number of transplanted donor cells in a process we term 'therapeutic liver repopulation'. This phenomenon is analogous to repopulation of the haematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Liver repopulation occurs when transplanted cells have a growth advantage in the setting of damage to recipient liver cells. It has been discovered that transplanted cells from extrahepatic sources such as the adult pancreas or bone marrow can also be used for liver repopulation. Because bone marrow donors are widely available, this finding raises the hope of therapeutic application of these cells in the future. Here, the current knowledge regarding therapeutic liver repopulation and the hopeful implications for treatment of liver diseases will be discussed.

AB - Orthotopic liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for several inborn errors of metabolism. Unfortunately, the supply of donor organs is limiting and therefore many patients cannot benefit from this therapy. In contrast, hepatocyte transplantation could potentially overcome the shortage in donor livers by use of cells from a single donor for multiple recipients. In classic hepatocyte transplantation, however, only 1% of the liver mass or less can be replaced by donor cells. Recently, though, it has been shown in animal models that >90% of host hepatocytes can be replaced by a small number of transplanted donor cells in a process we term 'therapeutic liver repopulation'. This phenomenon is analogous to repopulation of the haematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Liver repopulation occurs when transplanted cells have a growth advantage in the setting of damage to recipient liver cells. It has been discovered that transplanted cells from extrahepatic sources such as the adult pancreas or bone marrow can also be used for liver repopulation. Because bone marrow donors are widely available, this finding raises the hope of therapeutic application of these cells in the future. Here, the current knowledge regarding therapeutic liver repopulation and the hopeful implications for treatment of liver diseases will be discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035017233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035017233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/A:1010375203539

DO - 10.1023/A:1010375203539

M3 - Article

C2 - 11405342

AN - SCOPUS:0035017233

VL - 24

SP - 231

EP - 244

JO - Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease

JF - Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease

SN - 0141-8955

IS - 2

ER -