Linking Workplace Aggression to Employee Well-Being and Work: The Moderating Role of Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (FSSB)

Nanette L. Yragui, Caitlin A. Demsky, Leslie Hammer, Sarah van Dyck, Moni B. Neradilek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The present study examined the moderating effects of family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) on the relationship between two types of workplace aggression (i.e., patient-initiated physical aggression and coworker-initiated psychological aggression) and employee well-being and work outcomes. Methodology: Data were obtained from a field sample of 417 healthcare workers in two psychiatric hospitals. Hypotheses were tested using moderated multiple regression analyses. Findings: Psychiatric care providers’ perceptions of FSSB moderated the relationship between patient-initiated physical aggression and physical symptoms, exhaustion and cynicism. In addition, FSSB moderated the relationship between coworker-initiated psychological aggression and physical symptoms and turnover intentions. Implications: Based on our findings, family-supportive supervision is a plausible boundary condition for the relationship between workplace aggression and well-being and work outcomes. This study suggests that, in addition to directly addressing aggression prevention and reduction, family-supportive supervision is a trainable resource that healthcare organizations should facilitate to improve employee work and well-being in settings with high workplace aggression. Originality: This is the first study to examine the role of FSSB in influencing the relationship between two forms of workplace aggression: patient-initiated physical and coworker-initiated psychological aggression and employee outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Business and Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 21 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aggression
Workplace
Psychology
Supervisors
Work place
Employee well-being
Delivery of Health Care
Psychiatric Hospitals
Psychiatry
Regression Analysis
Organizations

Keywords

  • Conservation of resources theory
  • Family-supportive supervisor behaviors
  • Health
  • Occupational stress
  • Workplace aggression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Linking Workplace Aggression to Employee Well-Being and Work : The Moderating Role of Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (FSSB). / Yragui, Nanette L.; Demsky, Caitlin A.; Hammer, Leslie; van Dyck, Sarah; Neradilek, Moni B.

In: Journal of Business and Psychology, 21.03.2016, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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