Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. VII. Jet lag.

Z. Boulos, S. S. Campbell, Alfred Lewy, M. Terman, D. J. Dijk, C. I. Eastman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep disturbances are an all-too-familiar symptom of jet lag and a prime source of complaints for transmeridian travelers and flight crews alike. They are the result of a temporary loss of synchrony between an abruptly shifted sleep period, timed in accordance with the new local day-night cycle, and a gradually reentraining circadian system. Scheduled exposure to bright light can, in principle, alleviate the symptoms of jet lag by accelerating circadian reentrainment to new time zones. Laboratory simulations, in which sleep time is advanced by 6 to 8 h and the subjects exposed to bright light for 3 to 4 h during late subjective night on 2 to 4 successive days, have not all been successful. The few field studies conducted to date have had encouraging results, but their applicability to the population at large remains uncertain due to very limited sample sizes. Unresolved issues include optimal times for light exposure on the first as well as on subsequent treatment days, whether a given, fixed, light exposure time is likely to benefit a majority of travelers or whether light treatment should be scheduled instead according to some individual circadian phase marker, and if so, can such a phase marker be found that is both practical and reliable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-176
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biological Rhythms
Volume10
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1995

Fingerprint

Consensus
Light
sleep
Sleep
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Therapeutics
Sample Size
exposure duration
flight
Sleep Wake Disorders
sleep disorders
Population
sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Boulos, Z., Campbell, S. S., Lewy, A., Terman, M., Dijk, D. J., & Eastman, C. I. (1995). Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. VII. Jet lag. Journal of Biological Rhythms, 10(2), 167-176.

Light treatment for sleep disorders : consensus report. VII. Jet lag. / Boulos, Z.; Campbell, S. S.; Lewy, Alfred; Terman, M.; Dijk, D. J.; Eastman, C. I.

In: Journal of Biological Rhythms, Vol. 10, No. 2, 06.1995, p. 167-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boulos, Z, Campbell, SS, Lewy, A, Terman, M, Dijk, DJ & Eastman, CI 1995, 'Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. VII. Jet lag.', Journal of Biological Rhythms, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 167-176.
Boulos Z, Campbell SS, Lewy A, Terman M, Dijk DJ, Eastman CI. Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. VII. Jet lag. Journal of Biological Rhythms. 1995 Jun;10(2):167-176.
Boulos, Z. ; Campbell, S. S. ; Lewy, Alfred ; Terman, M. ; Dijk, D. J. ; Eastman, C. I. / Light treatment for sleep disorders : consensus report. VII. Jet lag. In: Journal of Biological Rhythms. 1995 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 167-176.
@article{6d568b4fa4c0424ba487c3a47fca16c4,
title = "Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. VII. Jet lag.",
abstract = "Sleep disturbances are an all-too-familiar symptom of jet lag and a prime source of complaints for transmeridian travelers and flight crews alike. They are the result of a temporary loss of synchrony between an abruptly shifted sleep period, timed in accordance with the new local day-night cycle, and a gradually reentraining circadian system. Scheduled exposure to bright light can, in principle, alleviate the symptoms of jet lag by accelerating circadian reentrainment to new time zones. Laboratory simulations, in which sleep time is advanced by 6 to 8 h and the subjects exposed to bright light for 3 to 4 h during late subjective night on 2 to 4 successive days, have not all been successful. The few field studies conducted to date have had encouraging results, but their applicability to the population at large remains uncertain due to very limited sample sizes. Unresolved issues include optimal times for light exposure on the first as well as on subsequent treatment days, whether a given, fixed, light exposure time is likely to benefit a majority of travelers or whether light treatment should be scheduled instead according to some individual circadian phase marker, and if so, can such a phase marker be found that is both practical and reliable.",
author = "Z. Boulos and Campbell, {S. S.} and Alfred Lewy and M. Terman and Dijk, {D. J.} and Eastman, {C. I.}",
year = "1995",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "167--176",
journal = "Journal of Biological Rhythms",
issn = "0748-7304",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Light treatment for sleep disorders

T2 - consensus report. VII. Jet lag.

AU - Boulos, Z.

AU - Campbell, S. S.

AU - Lewy, Alfred

AU - Terman, M.

AU - Dijk, D. J.

AU - Eastman, C. I.

PY - 1995/6

Y1 - 1995/6

N2 - Sleep disturbances are an all-too-familiar symptom of jet lag and a prime source of complaints for transmeridian travelers and flight crews alike. They are the result of a temporary loss of synchrony between an abruptly shifted sleep period, timed in accordance with the new local day-night cycle, and a gradually reentraining circadian system. Scheduled exposure to bright light can, in principle, alleviate the symptoms of jet lag by accelerating circadian reentrainment to new time zones. Laboratory simulations, in which sleep time is advanced by 6 to 8 h and the subjects exposed to bright light for 3 to 4 h during late subjective night on 2 to 4 successive days, have not all been successful. The few field studies conducted to date have had encouraging results, but their applicability to the population at large remains uncertain due to very limited sample sizes. Unresolved issues include optimal times for light exposure on the first as well as on subsequent treatment days, whether a given, fixed, light exposure time is likely to benefit a majority of travelers or whether light treatment should be scheduled instead according to some individual circadian phase marker, and if so, can such a phase marker be found that is both practical and reliable.

AB - Sleep disturbances are an all-too-familiar symptom of jet lag and a prime source of complaints for transmeridian travelers and flight crews alike. They are the result of a temporary loss of synchrony between an abruptly shifted sleep period, timed in accordance with the new local day-night cycle, and a gradually reentraining circadian system. Scheduled exposure to bright light can, in principle, alleviate the symptoms of jet lag by accelerating circadian reentrainment to new time zones. Laboratory simulations, in which sleep time is advanced by 6 to 8 h and the subjects exposed to bright light for 3 to 4 h during late subjective night on 2 to 4 successive days, have not all been successful. The few field studies conducted to date have had encouraging results, but their applicability to the population at large remains uncertain due to very limited sample sizes. Unresolved issues include optimal times for light exposure on the first as well as on subsequent treatment days, whether a given, fixed, light exposure time is likely to benefit a majority of travelers or whether light treatment should be scheduled instead according to some individual circadian phase marker, and if so, can such a phase marker be found that is both practical and reliable.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029315976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029315976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7632990

AN - SCOPUS:0029315976

VL - 10

SP - 167

EP - 176

JO - Journal of Biological Rhythms

JF - Journal of Biological Rhythms

SN - 0748-7304

IS - 2

ER -