Light treatment for sleep disorders

consensus report. III. Alerting and activating effects.

S. S. Campbell, D. J. Dijk, Z. Boulos, C. I. Eastman, Alfred Lewy, M. Terman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In addition to the well-established phase-shifting properties of timed exposure to bright light, some investigators have reported an acute alerting, or activating, effect of bright light exposure. To the extent that bright light interventions for sleep disturbance may cause subjective and/or central nervous system activation, such a property may adversely affect the efficacy of treatment. Data obtained from patient samples and from healthy subjects generally support the notion that exposure to bright light may be associated with enhanced subjective alertness, and there is limited evidence of objective changes (EEG, skin conductance levels) that are consistent with true physiological arousal. Such activation appears to be quite transient, and there is little evidence to suggest that bright light-induced activation interferes with subsequent sleep onset. Some depressed patients, however, have experienced insomnia and hypomanic activation following bright-light exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-132
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Biological Rhythms
Volume10
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1995

Fingerprint

Consensus
Light
sleep
Sleep
Therapeutics
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Arousal
skin (animal)
central nervous system
Sleep Wake Disorders
sleep disorders
Electroencephalography
Healthy Volunteers
Central Nervous System
Research Personnel
Skin
sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Campbell, S. S., Dijk, D. J., Boulos, Z., Eastman, C. I., Lewy, A., & Terman, M. (1995). Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. III. Alerting and activating effects. Journal of Biological Rhythms, 10(2), 129-132.

Light treatment for sleep disorders : consensus report. III. Alerting and activating effects. / Campbell, S. S.; Dijk, D. J.; Boulos, Z.; Eastman, C. I.; Lewy, Alfred; Terman, M.

In: Journal of Biological Rhythms, Vol. 10, No. 2, 06.1995, p. 129-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campbell, SS, Dijk, DJ, Boulos, Z, Eastman, CI, Lewy, A & Terman, M 1995, 'Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. III. Alerting and activating effects.', Journal of Biological Rhythms, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 129-132.
Campbell SS, Dijk DJ, Boulos Z, Eastman CI, Lewy A, Terman M. Light treatment for sleep disorders: consensus report. III. Alerting and activating effects. Journal of Biological Rhythms. 1995 Jun;10(2):129-132.
Campbell, S. S. ; Dijk, D. J. ; Boulos, Z. ; Eastman, C. I. ; Lewy, Alfred ; Terman, M. / Light treatment for sleep disorders : consensus report. III. Alerting and activating effects. In: Journal of Biological Rhythms. 1995 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 129-132.
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