Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy for the study of the murine heart

Yichen Ding, Zachary Bailey, Victoria Messerschmidt, Jun Nie, Richard Bryant, Sandra Rugonyi, Peng Fei, Juhyun Lee, Tzung K. Hsiai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has been widely used for rapid image acquisition with a high axial resolution from micrometer to millimeter scale. Traditional light-sheet techniques involve the use of a single illumination beam directed orthogonally at sample tissue. Images of large samples that are produced using a single illumination beam contain stripes or artifacts and suffer from a reduced resolution due to the scattering and absorption of light by the tissue. This study uses a dual-sided illumination beam and a simplified CLARITY optical clearing technique for the murine heart. These techniques allow for deeper imaging by removing lipids from the heart and produce a large field of imaging, greater than 10 x 10 x 10 mm3. As a result, this strategy enables us to quantify the ventricular dimensions, track the cardiac lineage, and localize the spatial distribution of cardiac-specific proteins and ion-channels from the post-natal to adult mouse hearts with sufficient contrast and resolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere57769
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2018
Issue number139
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 15 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Bioengineering
  • Cardiomyocytes
  • CLARITY
  • Dual illumination
  • Heart
  • Issue 139
  • Light sheet fluorescence microscopy
  • LSFM
  • Murine
  • Optical clearing
  • Ventricle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Ding, Y., Bailey, Z., Messerschmidt, V., Nie, J., Bryant, R., Rugonyi, S., ... Hsiai, T. K. (2018). Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy for the study of the murine heart. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 2018(139), [e57769]. https://doi.org/10.3791/57769