Let's get healthy! health awareness through public participation in an education and research exhibit

Lisa K. Marriott, William Cameron, Jonathan Purnell, Stephano Cetola, Matthew K. Ito, Craig D. Williams, Kenneth C. Newcomb, Joan A. Randall, Wyatt B. Messenger, Adam C. Lipus, Jackilen (Jackie) Shannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Health information technology (HIT) offers a resource for public empowerment through tailored information. Objective: Use interactive community health events to improve awareness of chronic disease risk factors while collecting data to improve health. Methods: Let's Get Healthy! is an education and research program in which participants visit interactive research stations to learn about their own health (diet, body composition, blood chemistry). HIT enables computerized data collection that presents participants with immediate results and tailored educational feedback. An anonymous wristband number links collected data in a population database. Results and Lessons Learned: Communities tailor events to meet community health needs with volunteers trained to conduct research. Participants experience being a research participant and contribute to an anonymous population database for both traditional research purposes and opensource community use. Conclusions: By integrating HIT with community involvement, health fairs become an interactive method for engaging communities in research and raising health awareness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-337
Number of pages7
JournalProgress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

health awareness
Education
Medical Informatics
participation
Health
health information
Research
community
health
education
information technology
Health Fairs
Databases
event
Body Composition
Population
Community Participation
empowerment
Volunteers
Chronic Disease

Keywords

  • Access public health
  • Community health research
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Education
  • Health care evaluation mechanisms
  • Health care quality
  • Health care technology assessment
  • Nonprofessional
  • Rural population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Let's get healthy! health awareness through public participation in an education and research exhibit. / Marriott, Lisa K.; Cameron, William; Purnell, Jonathan; Cetola, Stephano; Ito, Matthew K.; Williams, Craig D.; Newcomb, Kenneth C.; Randall, Joan A.; Messenger, Wyatt B.; Lipus, Adam C.; Shannon, Jackilen (Jackie).

In: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, Vol. 6, No. 3, 2012, p. 331-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marriott, Lisa K. ; Cameron, William ; Purnell, Jonathan ; Cetola, Stephano ; Ito, Matthew K. ; Williams, Craig D. ; Newcomb, Kenneth C. ; Randall, Joan A. ; Messenger, Wyatt B. ; Lipus, Adam C. ; Shannon, Jackilen (Jackie). / Let's get healthy! health awareness through public participation in an education and research exhibit. In: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action. 2012 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 331-337.
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