Lessons from "unexpected increased mortality after implementation of a commercially sold computerized physician order entry system"

Dean F. Sittig, Joan Ash, Jiajie Zhang, Jerome A. Osheroff, M. Michael Shabot

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

We are writing in response to the article “Unexpected Increased Mortality After Implementation of a Commercially Sold Computerized Physician Order Entry System” by Han et al. [1] The authors are to be congratulated for their courage in bringing their compelling account of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) implementation problems to the medical literature as they tried to interpret their results concerning mortality. Their article is as much a search for answers as it is a recitation of the shortfalls in their implementation process and computer systems. It is critically important to understand that the types of problems described by Han et al are not limited to their institution. In fact, setbacks and failures in the implementation of clinical information systems (CISs) and CPOE systems are all too common (eg, see refs 2-4). Although it is tempting to focus solely on the role of new technology in the problems highlighted by this example, there are also important lessons to be learned about related organizational and workflow factors that affect the potential for danger associated with CPOE implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationElectronic Health Records
Subtitle of host publicationChallenges in Design and Implementation
PublisherApple Academic Press
Pages359-368
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781482231557
ISBN (Print)9781926895932
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Mortality
Physicians
Factors
Information systems
Implementation process
Computer systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Sittig, D. F., Ash, J., Zhang, J., Osheroff, J. A., & Michael Shabot, M. (2013). Lessons from "unexpected increased mortality after implementation of a commercially sold computerized physician order entry system". In Electronic Health Records: Challenges in Design and Implementation (pp. 359-368). Apple Academic Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b16306

Lessons from "unexpected increased mortality after implementation of a commercially sold computerized physician order entry system". / Sittig, Dean F.; Ash, Joan; Zhang, Jiajie; Osheroff, Jerome A.; Michael Shabot, M.

Electronic Health Records: Challenges in Design and Implementation. Apple Academic Press, 2013. p. 359-368.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sittig, DF, Ash, J, Zhang, J, Osheroff, JA & Michael Shabot, M 2013, Lessons from "unexpected increased mortality after implementation of a commercially sold computerized physician order entry system". in Electronic Health Records: Challenges in Design and Implementation. Apple Academic Press, pp. 359-368. https://doi.org/10.1201/b16306
Sittig DF, Ash J, Zhang J, Osheroff JA, Michael Shabot M. Lessons from "unexpected increased mortality after implementation of a commercially sold computerized physician order entry system". In Electronic Health Records: Challenges in Design and Implementation. Apple Academic Press. 2013. p. 359-368 https://doi.org/10.1201/b16306
Sittig, Dean F. ; Ash, Joan ; Zhang, Jiajie ; Osheroff, Jerome A. ; Michael Shabot, M. / Lessons from "unexpected increased mortality after implementation of a commercially sold computerized physician order entry system". Electronic Health Records: Challenges in Design and Implementation. Apple Academic Press, 2013. pp. 359-368
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