Learning by following a food source

Allen Neuringer, Martha Neuringer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Hungry pigeons first learned to eat grain from the experimenter's hand. When the hand approached and "pecked" a small disk to produce grain in a food hopper, the pigeons followed the hand and rapidly learned to peck the disk. Birds given operant conditioning training took significantly longer to learn the same response. Under natural conditions, young animals may learn to behave like their parents simply by following parental sources of food.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1005-1008
    Number of pages4
    JournalScience
    Volume184
    Issue number4140
    StatePublished - 1974

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    Hand
    Columbidae
    Learning
    Food
    Operant Conditioning
    Birds

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

    Cite this

    Neuringer, A., & Neuringer, M. (1974). Learning by following a food source. Science, 184(4140), 1005-1008.

    Learning by following a food source. / Neuringer, Allen; Neuringer, Martha.

    In: Science, Vol. 184, No. 4140, 1974, p. 1005-1008.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Neuringer, A & Neuringer, M 1974, 'Learning by following a food source', Science, vol. 184, no. 4140, pp. 1005-1008.
    Neuringer A, Neuringer M. Learning by following a food source. Science. 1974;184(4140):1005-1008.
    Neuringer, Allen ; Neuringer, Martha. / Learning by following a food source. In: Science. 1974 ; Vol. 184, No. 4140. pp. 1005-1008.
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