Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, Maintain: An Evidence-Based Pedagogical Framework for Procedural Skill Training in Medicine

Taylor Sawyer, Marjorie White, Pavan Zaveri, Todd Chang, Anne Ades, Heather French, Jodee Anderson, Marc Auerbach, Lindsay Johnston, David Kessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acquisition of competency in procedural skills is a fundamental goal of medical training. In this Perspective, the authors propose an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training. The framework was developed based on a review of the literature using a critical synthesis approach and builds on earlier models of procedural skill training in medicine. The authors begin by describing the fundamentals of procedural skill development. Then, a six-step pedagogical framework for procedural skills training is presented: Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, and Maintain. In this framework, procedural skill training begins with the learner acquiring requisite cognitive knowledge through didactic education (Learn) and observation of the procedure (See). The learner then progresses to the stage of psychomotor skill acquisition and is allowed to deliberately practice the procedure on a simulator (Practice). Simulation-based mastery learning is employed to allow the trainee to prove competency prior to performing the procedure on a patient (Prove). Once competency is demonstrated on a simulator, the trainee is allowed to perform the procedure on patients with direct supervision, until he or she can be entrusted to perform the procedure independently (Do). Maintenance of the skill is ensured through continued clinical practice, supplemented by simulation-based training as needed (Maintain). Evidence in support of each component of the framework is presented. Implementation of the proposed framework presents a paradigm shift in procedural skill training. However, the authors believe that adoption of the framework will improve procedural skill training and patient safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1025-1033
Number of pages9
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume90
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 31 2015

Fingerprint

Medicine
medicine
evidence
trainee
Patient Safety
simulation
Maintenance
Observation
Learning
Education
didactics
supervision
paradigm
knowledge
learning
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, Maintain : An Evidence-Based Pedagogical Framework for Procedural Skill Training in Medicine. / Sawyer, Taylor; White, Marjorie; Zaveri, Pavan; Chang, Todd; Ades, Anne; French, Heather; Anderson, Jodee; Auerbach, Marc; Johnston, Lindsay; Kessler, David.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 90, No. 8, 31.08.2015, p. 1025-1033.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sawyer, T, White, M, Zaveri, P, Chang, T, Ades, A, French, H, Anderson, J, Auerbach, M, Johnston, L & Kessler, D 2015, 'Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, Maintain: An Evidence-Based Pedagogical Framework for Procedural Skill Training in Medicine', Academic Medicine, vol. 90, no. 8, pp. 1025-1033. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000000734
Sawyer, Taylor ; White, Marjorie ; Zaveri, Pavan ; Chang, Todd ; Ades, Anne ; French, Heather ; Anderson, Jodee ; Auerbach, Marc ; Johnston, Lindsay ; Kessler, David. / Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, Maintain : An Evidence-Based Pedagogical Framework for Procedural Skill Training in Medicine. In: Academic Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 90, No. 8. pp. 1025-1033.
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