Lack of choice in caregiving decision and caregiver risk of stress, North Carolina, 2005.

Erin D. Bouldin, Katherine H. Winter, Elena Andresen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: An aspect of caregiving that has received little attention is the degree to which the choice to provide care affects a caregiver's emotional well-being. We compared a population-based sample of informal caregivers who reported having a choice in caring with caregivers who did not have a choice in caring to determine the extent to which choice affects caregivers' self-reported stress. METHODS: We identified 341 informal caregivers who completed a caregiving module appended to the 2005 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. We determined participants' self-reported stress by using a 5-point scale that was dichotomized and used adjusted binomial logistic regression to assess the risk of stress given lack of choice in caregiving. RESULTS: In the fully adjusted model, caregivers without a choice in caring were more than 3 times as likely to report stress as caregivers with a choice in caring. High level of burden also increased stress. Caregivers with no choice in caring were most commonly the primary caregiver of a parent. CONCLUSION: Caregivers who do not have a choice in caregiving were at increased risk of stress, which may predispose them to poor health outcomes. Further investigation is needed to determine whether interventions that target caregivers without a choice in caring can reduce their levels of stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume7
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Caregivers
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Logistic Models
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Lack of choice in caregiving decision and caregiver risk of stress, North Carolina, 2005. / Bouldin, Erin D.; Winter, Katherine H.; Andresen, Elena.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 7, No. 2, 03.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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