Lack of association between serum magnesium and the risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease

Abigail Khan, Lisa Sullivan, Elizabeth McCabe, Daniel Levy, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Thomas J. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Experimental studies have linked hypomagnesemia with the development of vascular dysfunction, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Prior clinical studies have yielded conflicting results but were limited by the use of self-reported magnesium intake or short follow-up periods. Methods: We examined the relationship between serum magnesium concentration and incident hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and mortality in 3,531 middle-aged adult participants in the Framingham Heart Study offspring cohort. Analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards regressions, adjusted for traditional CVD risk factors. Results: Follow-up was 8 years for new-onset hypertension (551 events) and 20 years for CVD (554 events). There was no association between baseline serum magnesium and the development of hypertension (multivariable-adjusted hazards ratio per 0.15 mg/dL 1.03, 95% CI 0.92-1.15, P = .61), CVD (0.83, 95% CI 0.49-1.40, P = .49), or all-cause mortality (0.77, 95% CI 0.41-1.45, P = .42). Similar findings were observed in categorical analyses, in which serum magnesium was modeled in categories (2.2 mg/dL) or in quartiles. Conclusions: In conclusion, data from this large, community-based cohort do not support the hypothesis that low serum magnesium is a risk factor for developing hypertension or CVD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-720
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume160
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Magnesium
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hypertension
Serum
Mortality
Blood Vessels
Atherosclerosis
Cohort Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lack of association between serum magnesium and the risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. / Khan, Abigail; Sullivan, Lisa; McCabe, Elizabeth; Levy, Daniel; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 160, No. 4, 2010, p. 715-720.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, Abigail ; Sullivan, Lisa ; McCabe, Elizabeth ; Levy, Daniel ; Vasan, Ramachandran S. ; Wang, Thomas J. / Lack of association between serum magnesium and the risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In: American Heart Journal. 2010 ; Vol. 160, No. 4. pp. 715-720.
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