Kinetics for the collapse of trilayer liquid-crystalline disks from a monolayer at an air-water interface

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unlike surfactants considered in previous studies, when phosphatidylcholine (PC) monolayers collapse at constant surface tension to form a 3D bulk phase, surface area decreases at rates that slow. The different kinetics could result from collapse by a distinct mechanism. Rather than the transfer of molecules all along the interface between the monolayer and bulk phase, PC films can collapse by the folding and subsequent sliding of a bilayer over the monolayer. By this mechanism, molecules can transfer to collapsed trilayers through a locus of constant size. In this article, we use the theory of nucleation and growth to show analytically that during collapse, the area can decrease at rates that decelerate when each individual structure grows through a region of fixed dimensions. We also show that binary films of 30% dihydrocholesterol (dchol) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which have previously been shown to form a homogeneous monolayer from which trilayer disks grow through a point, collapse with rates of area decay that slow, in agreement with our analytical expressions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7303-7307
Number of pages5
JournalLangmuir
Volume21
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2005

Fingerprint

Monolayers
Crystalline materials
Kinetics
Water
air
kinetics
Liquids
liquids
Air
Phosphatidylcholines
water
Cholestanol
1,2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine
Molecules
Surface-Active Agents
Surface tension
loci
Surface active agents
Nucleation
folding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Kinetics for the collapse of trilayer liquid-crystalline disks from a monolayer at an air-water interface. / Rugonyi, Sandra; Smith, Ethan C.; Hall, Stephen (Steve).

In: Langmuir, Vol. 21, No. 16, 02.08.2005, p. 7303-7307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b8c85ab1f5204ef6875736219c048b04,
title = "Kinetics for the collapse of trilayer liquid-crystalline disks from a monolayer at an air-water interface",
abstract = "Unlike surfactants considered in previous studies, when phosphatidylcholine (PC) monolayers collapse at constant surface tension to form a 3D bulk phase, surface area decreases at rates that slow. The different kinetics could result from collapse by a distinct mechanism. Rather than the transfer of molecules all along the interface between the monolayer and bulk phase, PC films can collapse by the folding and subsequent sliding of a bilayer over the monolayer. By this mechanism, molecules can transfer to collapsed trilayers through a locus of constant size. In this article, we use the theory of nucleation and growth to show analytically that during collapse, the area can decrease at rates that decelerate when each individual structure grows through a region of fixed dimensions. We also show that binary films of 30{\%} dihydrocholesterol (dchol) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which have previously been shown to form a homogeneous monolayer from which trilayer disks grow through a point, collapse with rates of area decay that slow, in agreement with our analytical expressions.",
author = "Sandra Rugonyi and Smith, {Ethan C.} and Hall, {Stephen (Steve)}",
year = "2005",
month = "8",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1021/la0471083",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "7303--7307",
journal = "Langmuir",
issn = "0743-7463",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "16",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Kinetics for the collapse of trilayer liquid-crystalline disks from a monolayer at an air-water interface

AU - Rugonyi, Sandra

AU - Smith, Ethan C.

AU - Hall, Stephen (Steve)

PY - 2005/8/2

Y1 - 2005/8/2

N2 - Unlike surfactants considered in previous studies, when phosphatidylcholine (PC) monolayers collapse at constant surface tension to form a 3D bulk phase, surface area decreases at rates that slow. The different kinetics could result from collapse by a distinct mechanism. Rather than the transfer of molecules all along the interface between the monolayer and bulk phase, PC films can collapse by the folding and subsequent sliding of a bilayer over the monolayer. By this mechanism, molecules can transfer to collapsed trilayers through a locus of constant size. In this article, we use the theory of nucleation and growth to show analytically that during collapse, the area can decrease at rates that decelerate when each individual structure grows through a region of fixed dimensions. We also show that binary films of 30% dihydrocholesterol (dchol) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which have previously been shown to form a homogeneous monolayer from which trilayer disks grow through a point, collapse with rates of area decay that slow, in agreement with our analytical expressions.

AB - Unlike surfactants considered in previous studies, when phosphatidylcholine (PC) monolayers collapse at constant surface tension to form a 3D bulk phase, surface area decreases at rates that slow. The different kinetics could result from collapse by a distinct mechanism. Rather than the transfer of molecules all along the interface between the monolayer and bulk phase, PC films can collapse by the folding and subsequent sliding of a bilayer over the monolayer. By this mechanism, molecules can transfer to collapsed trilayers through a locus of constant size. In this article, we use the theory of nucleation and growth to show analytically that during collapse, the area can decrease at rates that decelerate when each individual structure grows through a region of fixed dimensions. We also show that binary films of 30% dihydrocholesterol (dchol) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which have previously been shown to form a homogeneous monolayer from which trilayer disks grow through a point, collapse with rates of area decay that slow, in agreement with our analytical expressions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23844470665&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23844470665&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/la0471083

DO - 10.1021/la0471083

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 7303

EP - 7307

JO - Langmuir

JF - Langmuir

SN - 0743-7463

IS - 16

ER -