KDM4B: A nail for every hammer?

Cailin Wilson, Adam Krieg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Epigenetic changes are well-established contributors to cancer progression and normal developmental processes. The reversible modification of histones plays a central role in regulating the nuclear processes of gene transcription, DNA replication, and DNA repair. The KDM4 family of Jumonj domain histone demethylases specifically target di-and tri-methylated lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3), removing a modification central to defining heterochromatin and gene repression. KDM4 enzymes are generally over-expressed in cancers, making them compelling targets for study and therapeutic inhibition. One of these family members, KDM4B, is especially interesting due to its regulation by multiple cellular stimuli, including DNA damage, steroid hormones, and hypoxia. In this review, we discuss what is known about the regulation of KDM4B in response to the cellular environment, and how this context-dependent expression may be translated into specific biological consequences in cancer and reproductive biology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number134
JournalGenes
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Nails
Histone Code
Histone Demethylases
Neoplasms
Heterochromatin
DNA Replication
Epigenomics
DNA Repair
Histones
Genes
Lysine
DNA Damage
Steroids
Hormones
Enzymes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Development
  • Histone demethylases
  • Hypoxia
  • KDM4B
  • Ovary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

KDM4B : A nail for every hammer? / Wilson, Cailin; Krieg, Adam.

In: Genes, Vol. 10, No. 2, 134, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wilson, Cailin ; Krieg, Adam. / KDM4B : A nail for every hammer?. In: Genes. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 2.
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