ISway: A sensitive, valid and reliable measure of postural control

Martina Mancini, Arash Salarian, Patricia Carlson-Kuhta, Cris Zampieri, Laurie King, Lorenzo Chiari, Fay Horak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

159 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clinicians need a practical, objective test of postural control that is sensitive to mild neurological disease, shows experimental and clinical validity, and has good test-retest reliability. We developed an instrumented test of postural sway (ISway) using a body-worn accelerometer to offer an objective and practical measure of postural control. Methods. We conducted two separate studies with two groups of subjects. Study I: sensitivity and experimental concurrent validity. Thirteen subjects with early, untreated Parkinsons disease (PD) and 12 age-matched control subjects (CTR) were tested in the laboratory, to compare sway from force-plate COP and inertial sensors. Study II: test-retest reliability and clinical concurrent validity. A different set of 17 early-to-moderate, treated PD (tested ON medication), and 17 age-matched CTR subjects were tested in the clinic to compare clinical balance tests with sway from inertial sensors. For reliability, the sensor was removed, subjects rested for 30 min, and the protocol was repeated. Thirteen sway measures (7 time-domain, 5 frequency-domain measures, and JERK) were computed from the 2D time series acceleration (ACC) data to determine the best metrics for a clinical balance test. Results: Both center of pressure (COP) and ACC measures differentiated sway between CTR and untreated PD. JERK and time-domain measures showed the best test-retest reliability (JERK ICC was 0.86 in PD and 0.87 in CTR; time-domain measures ICC ranged from 0.55 to 0.84 in PD and from 0.60 to 0.89 in CTR). JERK, all but one time-domain measure, and one frequency measure were significantly correlated with the clinical postural stability score (r ranged from 0.50 to 0.63, 0.01 <p <0.05). Conclusions: Based on these results, we recommend a subset of the most sensitive, reliable, and valid ISway measures to characterize posture control in PD: 1) JERK, 2) RMS amplitude and mean velocity from the time-domain measures, and 3) centroidal frequency as the best frequency measure, as valid and reliable measures of balance control from ISway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number59
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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Parkinson Disease
Reproducibility of Results
Pressure
Posture

Keywords

  • Accelerometers
  • Inertial sensors
  • Parkinsons disease
  • Postural control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

ISway : A sensitive, valid and reliable measure of postural control. / Mancini, Martina; Salarian, Arash; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Zampieri, Cris; King, Laurie; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay.

In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, Vol. 9, No. 1, 59, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mancini, Martina ; Salarian, Arash ; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia ; Zampieri, Cris ; King, Laurie ; Chiari, Lorenzo ; Horak, Fay. / ISway : A sensitive, valid and reliable measure of postural control. In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation. 2012 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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