Ischemia-induced loss of brain calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

Hideyuki Yamamoto, Koji Fukunaga, Kevin Lee, Thomas Soderling

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    67 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Forebrain ischemia in gerbils, produced by brief bilateral carotid occlusion, induced the dramatic loss of Ca2+/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) as determined by both kinase activity assays and western blot analysis. In cortex and hippocampus, cytosolic CaM-kinase II was completely lost within 2-5 min of ischemia. Particulate CaM-kinase II was more stable and decreased in level ∼40% after 10 min of ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. CaM-kinase II in cerebellum, which does not become ischemic, was not affected. The rapid loss of CaM-kinase II within 2-5 min was quite specific because cytosolic cyclic AMP kinase and protein kinase C in hippocampus were not affected. These data indicate that cytosolic CaM-kinase II is one of the most rapidly degraded proteins after brief ischemia. Because the multifunctional CaM-kinase II has been implicated in the regulation of numerous neuronal functions, its loss may destine the neuronal cell for death.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1110-1117
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
    Volume58
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - Mar 1992

    Fingerprint

    Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
    Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases
    Brain
    Ischemia
    Hippocampus
    Adenylate Kinase
    Gerbillinae
    Prosencephalon
    Cyclic AMP
    Cerebellum
    Protein Kinase C
    Reperfusion
    Assays
    Cell Death
    Phosphotransferases
    Western Blotting

    Keywords

    • Hippocampus
    • Ischemia
    • Neuronal cell death
    • Protein kinase

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry
    • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

    Cite this

    Yamamoto, H., Fukunaga, K., Lee, K., & Soderling, T. (1992). Ischemia-induced loss of brain calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Journal of Neurochemistry, 58(3), 1110-1117.

    Ischemia-induced loss of brain calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. / Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Fukunaga, Koji; Lee, Kevin; Soderling, Thomas.

    In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 58, No. 3, 03.1992, p. 1110-1117.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Yamamoto, H, Fukunaga, K, Lee, K & Soderling, T 1992, 'Ischemia-induced loss of brain calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II', Journal of Neurochemistry, vol. 58, no. 3, pp. 1110-1117.
    Yamamoto H, Fukunaga K, Lee K, Soderling T. Ischemia-induced loss of brain calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Journal of Neurochemistry. 1992 Mar;58(3):1110-1117.
    Yamamoto, Hideyuki ; Fukunaga, Koji ; Lee, Kevin ; Soderling, Thomas. / Ischemia-induced loss of brain calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. In: Journal of Neurochemistry. 1992 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 1110-1117.
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