Is the wear of dental composites still a clinical concern?. Is there still a need for in vitro wear simulating devices?

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65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While once considered a major concern for posterior restorations, wear of dental composites has been substantially reduced by changes in formulation and is considered today by many to be a solved problem. However, minimal evidence exists in the literature to support this conclusion for large restorations, especially those involving the replacement of functional cusps, despite the fact that these restorations are routinely performed. Evidence shows that wear may be of minimal importance for restorations of small to moderate size. However, the literature does suggest that failure rates are higher for larger restorations, and that wear may still be a significant mode of failure for patients with bruxing and clenching habits. In this light, the wear of composites continues to be studied by many researchers, and it is justifiable to seek well-defined and reproducible in vitro methods for predicting this multifactorial phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-692
Number of pages4
JournalDental Materials
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

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Dental Restoration Wear
Tooth Wear
Dental composites
Restoration
Habits
Research Personnel
Wear of materials
Equipment and Supplies
In Vitro Techniques
Composite materials

Keywords

  • Clinical studies
  • Dental composite
  • Wear
  • Wear testing devices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "While once considered a major concern for posterior restorations, wear of dental composites has been substantially reduced by changes in formulation and is considered today by many to be a solved problem. However, minimal evidence exists in the literature to support this conclusion for large restorations, especially those involving the replacement of functional cusps, despite the fact that these restorations are routinely performed. Evidence shows that wear may be of minimal importance for restorations of small to moderate size. However, the literature does suggest that failure rates are higher for larger restorations, and that wear may still be a significant mode of failure for patients with bruxing and clenching habits. In this light, the wear of composites continues to be studied by many researchers, and it is justifiable to seek well-defined and reproducible in vitro methods for predicting this multifactorial phenomenon.",
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