Is herpes simplex virus associated with peptic ulcer disease?

J. Matthias Löhr, Jay Nelson, Michael B A Oldstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be associated with peptic ulcer disease, we examined ukerative lesions of the distal stomach and proximal duodenum for the presence of nucleic acids and antibodies specific for HSV-1. Utilizing in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction with sequencing, gastric or duodenal tissues from 4 of 22 patients (18%) with documented peptic ulcer disease demonstrated the presence of both specific HSV-1 nucleic acid sequences and proteins. HSV-1 was found restricted in clusters of cells near the margin of the ulcer but was absent at sites distal to the lesion. Several of such HSV-1-infected cells also contained cholecystokinin. These cholecystokinin-contaming cells are of neuroendocrine origin and receive contact from the vagal nerve. Campylobacter pylori bacteria were not found in three of the four peptic ulcer tissues that harbored HSV-1. Further, none of the stomach or duodenal tissue samples from 33 patients undergoing clinical evaluation, but having no evidence of peptic ulcer disease, had HSV-1 materials. Thus, our data suggest that a subset of peptic ulcer disease may be associated with HSV-1 and raise the possibility that some peptic ulcers may be caused by this virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2168-2174
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume64
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

peptic ulcers
Human herpesvirus 1
herpes simplex
Human Herpesvirus 1
Simplexvirus
Peptic Ulcer
viruses
Stomach
cholecystokinin
stomach
Cholecystokinin
lesions (animal)
Nucleic Acids
nucleic acids
Neuroendocrine Cells
Helicobacter pylori
immunocytochemistry
cells
duodenum
Duodenum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Matthias Löhr, J., Nelson, J., & Oldstone, M. B. A. (1990). Is herpes simplex virus associated with peptic ulcer disease? Journal of Virology, 64(5), 2168-2174.

Is herpes simplex virus associated with peptic ulcer disease? / Matthias Löhr, J.; Nelson, Jay; Oldstone, Michael B A.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 64, No. 5, 1990, p. 2168-2174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matthias Löhr, J, Nelson, J & Oldstone, MBA 1990, 'Is herpes simplex virus associated with peptic ulcer disease?', Journal of Virology, vol. 64, no. 5, pp. 2168-2174.
Matthias Löhr, J. ; Nelson, Jay ; Oldstone, Michael B A. / Is herpes simplex virus associated with peptic ulcer disease?. In: Journal of Virology. 1990 ; Vol. 64, No. 5. pp. 2168-2174.
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