Ion mobility-enhanced MSE-based label-free analysis reveals effects of low-dose radiation post contextual fear conditioning training on the mouse hippocampal proteome

Lin Huang, Samanthi I. Wickramasekara, Tunde Akinyeke, Blair S. Stewart, Yuan Jiang, Jacob Raber, Claudia S. Maier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent advances in the field of biodosimetry have shown that the response of biological systems to ionizing radiation is complex and depends on the type and dose of radiation, the tissue(s) exposed, and the time lapsed after exposure. The biological effects of low dose radiation on learning and memory are not well understood. An ion mobility-enhanced data-independent acquisition (MSE) approach in conjunction with the ISOQuant software tool was utilized for label-free quantification of hippocampal proteins with the goal of determining protein alteration associated with low-dose whole body ionizing radiation (X-rays, 1 Gy) of 5.5-month-old male C57BL/6J mice post contextual fear conditioning training. Global proteome analysis revealed deregulation of 73 proteins (out of 399 proteins). Deregulated proteins indicated adverse effects of irradiation on myelination and perturbation of energy metabolism pathways involving a shift from the TCA cycle to glutamate oxidation. Our findings also indicate that proteins associated with synaptic activity, including vesicle recycling and neurotransmission, were altered in the irradiated mice. The elevated LTP and decreased LTD suggest improved synaptic transmission and enhanced efficiency of neurotransmitter release which would be consistent with the observed comparable contextual fear memory performance of the mice following post-training whole body or sham-irradiation. Significance: This study is significant because the biological consequences of low dose radiation on learning and memory are complex and not yet well understood. We conducted a IMS-enhanced MSE-based label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of hippocampal tissue with the goal of determining protein alteration associated with low-dose whole body ionizing radiation (X-ray, 1 Gy) of 5.5-month-old male C57BL/6J mice post contextual fear conditioning training. The IMS-enhanced MSE approach in conjunction with ISOQuant software was robust and accurate with low median CV values of 0.99% for the technical replicates of samples from both the sham and irradiated group. The biological variance was as low as 1.61% for the sham group and 1.31% for the irradiated group. The applied data generation and processing workflow allowed the quantitative evaluation of 399 proteins.The current proteomic analysis indicates that myelination is sensitive to low dose radiation. The observed protein level changes imply modulation of energy metabolism pathways in the radiation exposed group, specifically changes in protein abundance levels suggest a shift from TCA cycle to glutamate oxidation to satisfy energy demands. Most significantly, our study reveals deregulation of proteins involved in processes that govern synaptic activity including enhanced synaptic vesicle cycling, and altered long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD). An elevated LTP and decreased LTD suggest improved synaptic transmission and enhanced efficiency of neurotransmitter release which is consistent with the observed comparable contextual fear memory performance of the mice following post-training whole body or sham-irradiation. Overall, our results underscore the importance of low dose radiation experiments for illuminating the sensitivity of biochemical pathways to radiation, and the modulation of potential repair and compensatory response mechanisms. This kind of studies and associated findings may ultimately lead to the design of strategies for ameliorating hippocampal and CNS injury following radiation exposure as part of medical therapies or as a consequence of occupational hazards.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-36
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Proteomics
Volume140
DOIs
StatePublished - May 17 2016

Fingerprint

Proteome
Dosimetry
Fear
Labels
Ions
Radiation
Proteins
Long-Term Potentiation
Ionizing radiation
Ionizing Radiation
Synaptic Transmission
Data storage equipment
Deregulation
Whole-Body Irradiation
Irradiation
Depression
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Proteomics
Energy Metabolism
Neurotransmitter Agents

Keywords

  • Hippocampus
  • Label-free quantification
  • Myelination
  • Radiation
  • Synaptic activity
  • TCA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Ion mobility-enhanced MSE-based label-free analysis reveals effects of low-dose radiation post contextual fear conditioning training on the mouse hippocampal proteome. / Huang, Lin; Wickramasekara, Samanthi I.; Akinyeke, Tunde; Stewart, Blair S.; Jiang, Yuan; Raber, Jacob; Maier, Claudia S.

In: Journal of Proteomics, Vol. 140, 17.05.2016, p. 24-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, Lin ; Wickramasekara, Samanthi I. ; Akinyeke, Tunde ; Stewart, Blair S. ; Jiang, Yuan ; Raber, Jacob ; Maier, Claudia S. / Ion mobility-enhanced MSE-based label-free analysis reveals effects of low-dose radiation post contextual fear conditioning training on the mouse hippocampal proteome. In: Journal of Proteomics. 2016 ; Vol. 140. pp. 24-36.
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AU - Akinyeke, Tunde

AU - Stewart, Blair S.

AU - Jiang, Yuan

AU - Raber, Jacob

AU - Maier, Claudia S.

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