Ion channel evolution

Paul Brehm, Y. Okamura, Gail Mandel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrophysiological studies indicate that ion channels are present throughout the animal kingdom. Between distantly-related phyla, similarities in ion selectivity, gating, pharmacology and kinetics have obscured insights into how these proteins might have evolved. Moreover, deduced structures of a limited number of chordate and arthropod ion channels have shown that functionally disparate channel types often share a common structure. At least six different superfamilies of structurally-related ion channels have been described thus far, providing some clues for 'ancestral' proteins of a specific family. By contrast, evolutionary links (should they exist) among these superfamilies are less clear, requiring further structural analysis of ion channels in lower invertebrates, single-celled organisms and plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-367
Number of pages13
JournalSeminars in Neuroscience
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ion Channels
Chordata
Arthropods
Plant Cells
Invertebrates
Proteins
Pharmacology
Ions

Keywords

  • invertebrate
  • membrane proteins
  • phylogeny
  • receptor
  • sequence homology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Ion channel evolution. / Brehm, Paul; Okamura, Y.; Mandel, Gail.

In: Seminars in Neuroscience, Vol. 3, No. 5, 1991, p. 355-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brehm, Paul ; Okamura, Y. ; Mandel, Gail. / Ion channel evolution. In: Seminars in Neuroscience. 1991 ; Vol. 3, No. 5. pp. 355-367.
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