Investigation of cerebral development and injury in the prematurely born primate by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology

Terrie Inder, Jeffrey Neil, Christopher (Chris) Kroenke, Sandra Dieni, Bradley Yoder, Sandra Rees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We summarize the preliminary results of brain histopathology and magnetic resonance imaging applied to a premature baboon model developed for evaluation of the pathogenesis and treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Cerebral development was assessed in 10 gestational control animals at time points of 125, 140 and 160 days of gestation (dg). On the basis of histopathology, conventional MRI and diffusion MRI, 125 dg is equivalent to 26-28 weeks of human gestation, 140 dg is equivalent to 30-32 weeks, and 160 dg is equivalent to term. Preliminary data are also presented for 33 experimental cases delivered at 125 dg, nursed for 2 weeks in an intensive care facility, and sacrificed at 139-140 dg. The commonest neuropathology in this cohort is white matter damage, manifest by reactive astrogliosis or activated microglia, and enlarged ventricular size. Subarachnoid, germinal matrix and intraventricular hemorrhages are also common. These preliminary results support the similarity of this model to the human preterm infant for both cerebral development and the pattern of cerebral injury. The prematurely born baboon appears an important model for the study of preterm human birth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-111
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Neuroscience
Volume27
Issue number2-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primates
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pregnancy
Wounds and Injuries
Papio
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Premature Birth
Microglia
Critical Care
Premature Infants
Hemorrhage
Brain

Keywords

  • Baboon
  • Brain development
  • Histology
  • MRI
  • Prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Investigation of cerebral development and injury in the prematurely born primate by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. / Inder, Terrie; Neil, Jeffrey; Kroenke, Christopher (Chris); Dieni, Sandra; Yoder, Bradley; Rees, Sandra.

In: Developmental Neuroscience, Vol. 27, No. 2-4, 03.2005, p. 100-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inder, Terrie ; Neil, Jeffrey ; Kroenke, Christopher (Chris) ; Dieni, Sandra ; Yoder, Bradley ; Rees, Sandra. / Investigation of cerebral development and injury in the prematurely born primate by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. In: Developmental Neuroscience. 2005 ; Vol. 27, No. 2-4. pp. 100-111.
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