Intubation success rates improve for an air medical program after implementing the use of neuromuscular blocking agents

Oscar Ma, R. Brett Atchley, Todd Hatley, Mike Green, Jeffrey Young, William Brady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether the success rate for endotracheal intubation improves after implementing the use of neuromuscular blocking (NMB) agents in an air medical program, this retrospective study analyzed all patients requiring endotracheal intubation at two air medical programs (nurse/paramedic crews) over a 5-year period. Air medical program A, the control group, had employed NMB agents throughout the entire study period. Air medical program B, which did not use NMB agents from July 1, 1989 through June 30, 1992, implemented their use starting July 1, 1992. For program A, the overall intubation success rate was 93.5% (202 successful intubations in 216 patients) and the successful intubations/total attempts ratio was 0.67 (202 of 301). For program B, the overall intubation success rate improved from 66.7% (46 successful intubations in 69 patients) before NMB agent use to 90.5% (57 in 63) after NMB agent use (P = .001). The successful intubation/total attempts ratio increased from 0.36 (51 of 141) prior to NMB agent use to 0.48 (63 of 132) after NMB agent use (P = NS). In comparing the 92 patients who did not receive NMB agents to the 40 patients who did, the intubation success rate increased from 69.6% (64 of 92) to 97.5% (39 of 40) (P <.001) and the successful intubation/total attempts ration increased from 0.36 (73 of 202) to 0.58 (41 of 71) (P = .007). With the use of NMB agents, program B's overall intubation success rate increased significantly, matching the results of program A.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-127
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuromuscular Blocking Agents
Intubation
Air
Intratracheal Intubation
Allied Health Personnel
Retrospective Studies
Nurses
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Air medical transport
  • Airway
  • Intubation
  • Neuromuscular blocking agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Intubation success rates improve for an air medical program after implementing the use of neuromuscular blocking agents. / Ma, Oscar; Atchley, R. Brett; Hatley, Todd; Green, Mike; Young, Jeffrey; Brady, William.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 2, 1998, p. 125-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ma, Oscar ; Atchley, R. Brett ; Hatley, Todd ; Green, Mike ; Young, Jeffrey ; Brady, William. / Intubation success rates improve for an air medical program after implementing the use of neuromuscular blocking agents. In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 125-127.
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abstract = "To determine whether the success rate for endotracheal intubation improves after implementing the use of neuromuscular blocking (NMB) agents in an air medical program, this retrospective study analyzed all patients requiring endotracheal intubation at two air medical programs (nurse/paramedic crews) over a 5-year period. Air medical program A, the control group, had employed NMB agents throughout the entire study period. Air medical program B, which did not use NMB agents from July 1, 1989 through June 30, 1992, implemented their use starting July 1, 1992. For program A, the overall intubation success rate was 93.5{\%} (202 successful intubations in 216 patients) and the successful intubations/total attempts ratio was 0.67 (202 of 301). For program B, the overall intubation success rate improved from 66.7{\%} (46 successful intubations in 69 patients) before NMB agent use to 90.5{\%} (57 in 63) after NMB agent use (P = .001). The successful intubation/total attempts ratio increased from 0.36 (51 of 141) prior to NMB agent use to 0.48 (63 of 132) after NMB agent use (P = NS). In comparing the 92 patients who did not receive NMB agents to the 40 patients who did, the intubation success rate increased from 69.6{\%} (64 of 92) to 97.5{\%} (39 of 40) (P <.001) and the successful intubation/total attempts ration increased from 0.36 (73 of 202) to 0.58 (41 of 71) (P = .007). With the use of NMB agents, program B's overall intubation success rate increased significantly, matching the results of program A.",
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