Intraoperative autologous blood transfusion use during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer: Long-term follow-up of a prospective trial

David B. Engle, Joseph P. Connor, Peter C. Morris, David P. Bender, Koenraad De Geest, Amina Ahmed, Michael J. Goodheart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose A primary operative complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer is hemorrhage. Intraoperative autologous blood transfusion (ABT) may be beneficial in reducing the need for homologous blood transfusion. Methods Our institution published a prospective cohort study examining the use of ABT in cervical cancer patients undergoing radical hysterectomy in 1995. Patients who were initially consented to participate in this prospective trial using intraoperative ABT (cell saver) were evaluated with a median follow-up of 3 years. We sought to update this original report with 16-year follow-up data collected from the clinical charts, Tumor Registry, and the Social Security Death Index. Results Two groups of patients undergoing radical hysterectomy were compared: patients who received ABT, and those who did not. Of the 71 original patients, all were included in this updated review, with an average follow-up of 12.4 years for both groups. Originally, thirty-one patients received an ABT. In this group, 1 patient was lost to follow-up, and 4 (12.9 %) are deceased including 1 (3 %) with disease. In the non-autologous group, there were 7 (17.5 %) patient deaths, including 3 (7.5 %) with disease. Eighty-three percent were alive after 12 years in both groups. The ABT group had 1 patient (3 %) who developed a secondary malignancy, a colon adenocarcinoma. The non-autologous group had 2 patients (5 %) who developed a secondary malignancy; one patient developed multiple myeloma and one patient developed a verrucous cancer of the tongue. Conclusions Autologous blood transfusion during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer appears safe and effective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-721
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume286
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Autologous Blood Transfusions
Hysterectomy
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Tongue Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Social Security
Lost to Follow-Up
Blood Group Antigens
Multiple Myeloma
Blood Transfusion
Registries
Blood Cells
Colon
Adenocarcinoma
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • Autologous blood transfusion
  • Cell saver
  • Cervical cancer
  • Radical hysterectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Intraoperative autologous blood transfusion use during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer : Long-term follow-up of a prospective trial. / Engle, David B.; Connor, Joseph P.; Morris, Peter C.; Bender, David P.; De Geest, Koenraad; Ahmed, Amina; Goodheart, Michael J.

In: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Vol. 286, No. 3, 09.2012, p. 717-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Engle, David B. ; Connor, Joseph P. ; Morris, Peter C. ; Bender, David P. ; De Geest, Koenraad ; Ahmed, Amina ; Goodheart, Michael J. / Intraoperative autologous blood transfusion use during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer : Long-term follow-up of a prospective trial. In: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2012 ; Vol. 286, No. 3. pp. 717-721.
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N2 - Purpose A primary operative complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer is hemorrhage. Intraoperative autologous blood transfusion (ABT) may be beneficial in reducing the need for homologous blood transfusion. Methods Our institution published a prospective cohort study examining the use of ABT in cervical cancer patients undergoing radical hysterectomy in 1995. Patients who were initially consented to participate in this prospective trial using intraoperative ABT (cell saver) were evaluated with a median follow-up of 3 years. We sought to update this original report with 16-year follow-up data collected from the clinical charts, Tumor Registry, and the Social Security Death Index. Results Two groups of patients undergoing radical hysterectomy were compared: patients who received ABT, and those who did not. Of the 71 original patients, all were included in this updated review, with an average follow-up of 12.4 years for both groups. Originally, thirty-one patients received an ABT. In this group, 1 patient was lost to follow-up, and 4 (12.9 %) are deceased including 1 (3 %) with disease. In the non-autologous group, there were 7 (17.5 %) patient deaths, including 3 (7.5 %) with disease. Eighty-three percent were alive after 12 years in both groups. The ABT group had 1 patient (3 %) who developed a secondary malignancy, a colon adenocarcinoma. The non-autologous group had 2 patients (5 %) who developed a secondary malignancy; one patient developed multiple myeloma and one patient developed a verrucous cancer of the tongue. Conclusions Autologous blood transfusion during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer appears safe and effective.

AB - Purpose A primary operative complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer is hemorrhage. Intraoperative autologous blood transfusion (ABT) may be beneficial in reducing the need for homologous blood transfusion. Methods Our institution published a prospective cohort study examining the use of ABT in cervical cancer patients undergoing radical hysterectomy in 1995. Patients who were initially consented to participate in this prospective trial using intraoperative ABT (cell saver) were evaluated with a median follow-up of 3 years. We sought to update this original report with 16-year follow-up data collected from the clinical charts, Tumor Registry, and the Social Security Death Index. Results Two groups of patients undergoing radical hysterectomy were compared: patients who received ABT, and those who did not. Of the 71 original patients, all were included in this updated review, with an average follow-up of 12.4 years for both groups. Originally, thirty-one patients received an ABT. In this group, 1 patient was lost to follow-up, and 4 (12.9 %) are deceased including 1 (3 %) with disease. In the non-autologous group, there were 7 (17.5 %) patient deaths, including 3 (7.5 %) with disease. Eighty-three percent were alive after 12 years in both groups. The ABT group had 1 patient (3 %) who developed a secondary malignancy, a colon adenocarcinoma. The non-autologous group had 2 patients (5 %) who developed a secondary malignancy; one patient developed multiple myeloma and one patient developed a verrucous cancer of the tongue. Conclusions Autologous blood transfusion during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer appears safe and effective.

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