Intraocular lens implantation for traumatic cataract in children in East Africa

Daniel Gradin, David Yorston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To review the visual outcomes and complications after intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in children with traumatic cataract in sub-Saharan Africa, where contact lenses for unilateral aphakia are impractical in most patients. Setting: PCEA Kikuyu Eye Unit, Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa. Methods: All children younger than 16 years having IOL implantation for traumatic cataract between February 1993 and December 1998 (215 eyes) were retrospectively reviewed. Complications and visual outcomes were evaluated. Results: The study group comprised 147 boys and 68 girls. The median interval between injury and cataract surgery was 8 weeks. The most common causes of injury were stick (36.3%) and thorn (10.7%). Extracapsular cataract extraction with IOL implantation was performed in all patients. The most frequent early complication was fibrinous uveitis in 110 eyes (51.2%). One hundred sixty-seven eyes (77.7%) had 1 month or more follow-up. Of those, 108 eyes (64.7%) had a best corrected visual acuity of 20/60 or better. Twenty-one eyes (12.6%) had a visual acuity of worse than 20/200, with the most common causes being amblyopia (9/21) and retinal detachment (5/21). Amblyopia was found in 42 of 108 (38.9%) children aged 8 years or less at the time of injury. Eyes with the IOL in the capsular bag were significantly less likely to require subsequent capsulotomy (P <.01) during the 2-year follow-up. Conclusion: The results indicate that posterior chamber IOLs can be safely implanted by experienced surgeons in most children older than 2 years with traumatic cataract and should be the standard of care throughout the world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2017-2025
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Eastern Africa
Intraocular Lens Implantation
Cataract
Amblyopia
Visual Acuity
Wounds and Injuries
Aphakia
Cataract Extraction
Africa South of the Sahara
Intraocular Lenses
Kenya
Contact Lenses
Uveitis
Retinal Detachment
Standard of Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Intraocular lens implantation for traumatic cataract in children in East Africa. / Gradin, Daniel; Yorston, David.

In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Vol. 27, No. 12, 2001, p. 2017-2025.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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