Interventions to reduce childhood antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory infections

Systematic review and meta-analysis

Yanhong Hu, John Walley, Roger Chou, Joseph D. Tucker, Joseph I. Harwell, Xinyin Wu, Jia Yin, Guanyang Zou, Xiaolin Wei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Antibiotics are overprescribed for children with upper respiratory infections (URIs), leading to unnecessary expenditures, adverse events and antibiotic resistance. This study assesses whether interventions antibiotic prescription rates (APR) for childhood URIs can be reduced and what factors impact intervention effectiveness. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Global Health, WHO website, United States CDC website and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched by December 2015. Cluster or individual-patient randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs that examined interventions to change APR for children with URIs were selected for meta-analysis. Educational interventions for clinicians and/or parents were compared with usual care. Results Of 6074 studies identified, 13 were included. All were conducted in high-income countries. Interventions were associated with lower APR versus usual care (OR 0.63 (95% CI 0.50 to 0.81, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 20 2016

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Respiratory Tract Infections
Meta-Analysis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Prescriptions
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Microbial Drug Resistance
Health Expenditures
MEDLINE
Randomized Controlled Trials
Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Interventions to reduce childhood antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory infections : Systematic review and meta-analysis. / Hu, Yanhong; Walley, John; Chou, Roger; Tucker, Joseph D.; Harwell, Joseph I.; Wu, Xinyin; Yin, Jia; Zou, Guanyang; Wei, Xiaolin.

In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 20.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, Yanhong ; Walley, John ; Chou, Roger ; Tucker, Joseph D. ; Harwell, Joseph I. ; Wu, Xinyin ; Yin, Jia ; Zou, Guanyang ; Wei, Xiaolin. / Interventions to reduce childhood antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory infections : Systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 2016.
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