Interventions to Improve Pharmacological Adherence Among Adults With Psychotic Spectrum Disorders and Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review

Daniel Hartung, Allison Low, Kazuaki Jindai, David Mansoor, Matthew Judge, Aaron Mendelson, Devan Kansagara, Makalapua Motu'apuaka, Michele Freeman, Karli Kondo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It is unclear as to which interventions are effective at improving medication adherence in individuals with serious and persistent mental illness. The goal of this systematic review is to synthesize evidence examining the effectiveness, harms, and costs of interventions to improve medication adherence in patients with psychotic spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of several electronic databases through January 2015 using a structured search strategy. Studies were included if they involved adult patients in general mental health settings, reported both measures of medication adherence and clinical outcomes, and were of sufficient methodological rigor. Studies were quality assessed and synthesized using established methods. Results: We identified 24 studies that met inclusion criteria. Overall, 20 studies addressed interventions in patients with psychotic spectrum disorders. These interventions varied widely, with generally mixed findings contributing to low or insufficient strength of evidence; studies involving family members and technology interventions were the most consistently associated with a positive effect; however, the strength of the evidence was low because of intervention heterogeneity. The evidence was insufficient to determine the effectiveness of interventions in patients with bipolar disorder. Conclusions: In individuals with psychotic spectrum disorders, interventions with family members or technology had the most consistent positive effect on adherence, although replication with objective adherence measures along with evaluation of harms and costs is needed. There was insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about interventions in individuals with bipolar disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychosomatics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 14 2016

Fingerprint

Bipolar Disorder
Psychotic Disorders
Medication Adherence
Pharmacology
Technology
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Mental Health
Databases
Costs and Cost Analysis
Systematic Review
Adherence

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Medication adherence
  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Interventions to Improve Pharmacological Adherence Among Adults With Psychotic Spectrum Disorders and Bipolar Disorder : A Systematic Review. / Hartung, Daniel; Low, Allison; Jindai, Kazuaki; Mansoor, David; Judge, Matthew; Mendelson, Aaron; Kansagara, Devan; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua; Freeman, Michele; Kondo, Karli.

In: Psychosomatics, 14.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hartung, Daniel ; Low, Allison ; Jindai, Kazuaki ; Mansoor, David ; Judge, Matthew ; Mendelson, Aaron ; Kansagara, Devan ; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua ; Freeman, Michele ; Kondo, Karli. / Interventions to Improve Pharmacological Adherence Among Adults With Psychotic Spectrum Disorders and Bipolar Disorder : A Systematic Review. In: Psychosomatics. 2016.
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