Interproximal contact loss between implant-supported restorations and adjacent natural teeth: A retrospective cross-sectional study of 83 restorations with an up to 10-year follow-up

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Abstract

Statement of problem: Interproximal contact loss between implant-supported restorations and adjacent natural teeth is a frequently encountered complication that could negatively affect surrounding tissues and/or patient satisfaction with treatment. The effect of interproximal contact loss on peri-implant tissue health and patient awareness of food impaction is currently unknown. Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to explore the effect of interproximal contact loss on peri-implant tissue health and determine whether interproximal contact loss leads to increased patient awareness of food impaction around the affected area. This study also aimed to identify whether specific patient or local factors could cause interproximal contact loss. Material and methods: Eighty-three participants with posterior single-unit implant-supported restorations were examined. The mean follow-up time after prosthesis insertion was 4 ±2.2 years (range 4 months to 10.6 years). Interproximal contacts were evaluated by using waxed dental floss. Patient age, sex, implant location, opposing tooth status, presence of endodontically treated adjacent tooth, and regular use of an occlusal device at night were recorded. Peri-implant probing depths and the presence of bleeding on probing were also recorded. Each participant was asked to indicate whether they had noticed increased food impaction around their implant-supported restoration. Statistical analysis included nonparametric Mann-Whitney U tests, the Spearman rank-order correlation, the Pearson chi-squared tests, and the paired t test (α=.05). Results: Among all examined mesial contacts, 34.1% were recorded as open, with an overall mesial interproximal contact loss (open and loose contacts combined) incidence of 48.8%. Restorations placed in premolar sites exhibited significantly tighter mesial interproximal contacts compared with those placed in molar sites (U=566, P=.041). A significant negative correlation was found between follow-up time after insertion and mesial contact tightness (rs=−0.226, P=.041). Conclusions: Interproximal contact loss appears to increase over time, with more surfaces being affected after longer periods of service. This study did not find an association between interproximal contact loss and peri-implant inflammation as measured by bleeding on probing, with the exception of the distolingual implant surface. Participants with interproximal contact loss were more aware of food impaction around their implant crown. Use of an occlusal device at night did not prevent interproximal contact loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

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