International study of the place of death of people with cancer

A population-level comparison of 14 countries across 4 continents using death certificate data

J. Cohen, L. Pivodic, G. Miccinesi, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, W. A. Naylor, D. M. Wilson, M. Loucka, A. Csikos, K. Pardon, L. Van Den Block, M. Ruiz-Ramos, M. Cardenas-Turanzas, Y. Rhee, R. Aubry, K. Hunt, Joan Teno, D. Houttekier, L. Deliens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:Where people die can influence a number of indicators of the quality of dying. We aimed to describe the place of death of people with cancer and its associations with clinical, socio-demographic and healthcare supply characteristics in 14 countries.Methods:Cross-sectional study using death certificate data for all deaths from cancer (ICD-10 codes C00-C97) in 2008 in Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, England, France, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Spain (2010), USA (2007) and Wales (N=1 355 910). Multivariable logistic regression analyses evaluated factors associated with home death within countries and differences across countries.Results:Between 12% (South Korea) and 57% (Mexico) of cancer deaths occurred at home; between 26% (Netherlands, New Zealand) and 87% (South Korea) occurred in hospital. The large between-country differences in home or hospital deaths were partly explained by differences in availability of hospital- and long-term care beds and general practitioners. Haematologic rather than solid cancer (odds ratios (ORs) 1.29-3.17) and being married rather than divorced (ORs 1.17-2.54) were most consistently associated with home death across countries.Conclusions:A large country variation in the place of death can partly be explained by countries' healthcare resources. Country-specific choices regarding the organisation of end-of-life cancer care likely explain an additional part. These findings indicate the further challenge to evaluate how different specific policies can influence place of death patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1397-1404
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume113
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 3 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Death Certificates
Republic of Korea
Population
Neoplasms
International Classification of Diseases
Mexico
New Zealand
Netherlands
Odds Ratio
Delivery of Health Care
Terminal Care
Divorce
Hungary
Czech Republic
Belgium
Wales
Long-Term Care
England
Spain
General Practitioners

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

International study of the place of death of people with cancer : A population-level comparison of 14 countries across 4 continents using death certificate data. / Cohen, J.; Pivodic, L.; Miccinesi, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B. D.; Naylor, W. A.; Wilson, D. M.; Loucka, M.; Csikos, A.; Pardon, K.; Van Den Block, L.; Ruiz-Ramos, M.; Cardenas-Turanzas, M.; Rhee, Y.; Aubry, R.; Hunt, K.; Teno, Joan; Houttekier, D.; Deliens, L.

In: British Journal of Cancer, Vol. 113, No. 9, 03.11.2015, p. 1397-1404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cohen, J, Pivodic, L, Miccinesi, G, Onwuteaka-Philipsen, BD, Naylor, WA, Wilson, DM, Loucka, M, Csikos, A, Pardon, K, Van Den Block, L, Ruiz-Ramos, M, Cardenas-Turanzas, M, Rhee, Y, Aubry, R, Hunt, K, Teno, J, Houttekier, D & Deliens, L 2015, 'International study of the place of death of people with cancer: A population-level comparison of 14 countries across 4 continents using death certificate data', British Journal of Cancer, vol. 113, no. 9, pp. 1397-1404. https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2015.312
Cohen, J. ; Pivodic, L. ; Miccinesi, G. ; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B. D. ; Naylor, W. A. ; Wilson, D. M. ; Loucka, M. ; Csikos, A. ; Pardon, K. ; Van Den Block, L. ; Ruiz-Ramos, M. ; Cardenas-Turanzas, M. ; Rhee, Y. ; Aubry, R. ; Hunt, K. ; Teno, Joan ; Houttekier, D. ; Deliens, L. / International study of the place of death of people with cancer : A population-level comparison of 14 countries across 4 continents using death certificate data. In: British Journal of Cancer. 2015 ; Vol. 113, No. 9. pp. 1397-1404.
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AU - Pivodic, L.

AU - Miccinesi, G.

AU - Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B. D.

AU - Naylor, W. A.

AU - Wilson, D. M.

AU - Loucka, M.

AU - Csikos, A.

AU - Pardon, K.

AU - Van Den Block, L.

AU - Ruiz-Ramos, M.

AU - Cardenas-Turanzas, M.

AU - Rhee, Y.

AU - Aubry, R.

AU - Hunt, K.

AU - Teno, Joan

AU - Houttekier, D.

AU - Deliens, L.

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N2 - Background:Where people die can influence a number of indicators of the quality of dying. We aimed to describe the place of death of people with cancer and its associations with clinical, socio-demographic and healthcare supply characteristics in 14 countries.Methods:Cross-sectional study using death certificate data for all deaths from cancer (ICD-10 codes C00-C97) in 2008 in Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, England, France, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Spain (2010), USA (2007) and Wales (N=1 355 910). Multivariable logistic regression analyses evaluated factors associated with home death within countries and differences across countries.Results:Between 12% (South Korea) and 57% (Mexico) of cancer deaths occurred at home; between 26% (Netherlands, New Zealand) and 87% (South Korea) occurred in hospital. The large between-country differences in home or hospital deaths were partly explained by differences in availability of hospital- and long-term care beds and general practitioners. Haematologic rather than solid cancer (odds ratios (ORs) 1.29-3.17) and being married rather than divorced (ORs 1.17-2.54) were most consistently associated with home death across countries.Conclusions:A large country variation in the place of death can partly be explained by countries' healthcare resources. Country-specific choices regarding the organisation of end-of-life cancer care likely explain an additional part. These findings indicate the further challenge to evaluate how different specific policies can influence place of death patterns.

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