International recommendations for consumption of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids

William Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As an appreciation of the cardioprotective properties of the long-chain, fish-oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids) has grown, so too have official dietary guidelines. Health organizations and government agencies are typically recommending intakes that either maintain the status quo (about 100-200 mg/day in most western countries) or are intended to actively reduce risk for cardiovascular disease. The latter are around usually 400-600 mg/day, an amount likely to stimulate commercial interests to fortify foods with omega-3 fatty acids. Fortification is perhaps the best long-term solution to the chronically-low intake of omega-3 fatty acids that plagues western cultures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Medicine
Volume8
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Government Agencies
Nutrition Policy
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Plague
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Fish Oils
Cardiovascular Diseases
Organizations
Food
Health

Keywords

  • A-linolenic acid
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid
  • Fish oils
  • Omega-3 fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

International recommendations for consumption of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids. / Harris, William.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vol. 8, No. SUPPL. 1, 09.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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