Internal and external scope in willingness-to-pay estimates for threatened and endangered wildlife

K. L. Giraud, J. B. Loomis, Richard Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Economic theory suggests willingness-to-pay (WTP) should be significantly higher for a comprehensive good than for a subset of that good. We tested this using both a split sample design (external scope test) and paired responses (internal scope test) for WTP for several endangered fish and wildlife species in the US. In the paired response case we corrected for correlation of willingness-to-pay responses using a bivariate probit model. Surprisingly, the independent split samples passed the scope test but the paired samples did not. As the results contradict each other, questions of validity for policy implications are raised. However, using either approach, the benefit of maintaining critical habitat for these species exceeds the costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-229
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1999
Externally publishedYes

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willingness to pay
Fish
Economics
Costs
economic theory
habitat
fish
cost
test
wildlife

Keywords

  • Contingent valuation
  • Endangered species
  • Probit
  • Willingness-to-pay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Internal and external scope in willingness-to-pay estimates for threatened and endangered wildlife. / Giraud, K. L.; Loomis, J. B.; Johnson, Richard.

In: Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 56, No. 3, 07.1999, p. 221-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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