Intermediate follow-up of laparoscopic antireflux surgery

Thadeus L. Trus, William S. Laycock, Gene Branum, J. Patrick Waring, Susan Mauren, John Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Open antireflux surgery is an established long-term treatment for chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease. Short-term results of laparoscopic antireflux surgery are excellent, but long-term follow-up is not yet available. METHODS: Twenty-four-hour ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring and symptom scores were collected prior to laparoscopic antireflux surgery and 6 weeks postoperatively. These studies were repeated in an unselected cohort of patients 1 to 3 years after operation. RESULTS: One hundred patients who were >1 year from surgery at the time of the present study volunteered for intermediate follow-up symptom assessment, and 35 also completed repeat 24-hour monitoring. The median interval after surgery among these volunteers was 17 months. Thirty-three (94%) had a normal pH study, which correlated with improvements in symptom scores. One patient had an abnormal pH study but no reflux symptoms, and 1 patient with an abnormal study developed recurrent symptoms of reflux after an episode of vomiting 11 months postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: The intermediate-term results of laparoscopic fundoplication suggest that long-term efficacy of this operation will be equivalent to open fundoplication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-35
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume171
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Laparoscopy
Fundoplication
Esophageal pH Monitoring
Symptom Assessment
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Vomiting
Volunteers
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Intermediate follow-up of laparoscopic antireflux surgery. / Trus, Thadeus L.; Laycock, William S.; Branum, Gene; Waring, J. Patrick; Mauren, Susan; Hunter, John.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 171, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 32-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trus, TL, Laycock, WS, Branum, G, Waring, JP, Mauren, S & Hunter, J 1996, 'Intermediate follow-up of laparoscopic antireflux surgery', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 171, no. 1, pp. 32-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9610(99)80069-5
Trus, Thadeus L. ; Laycock, William S. ; Branum, Gene ; Waring, J. Patrick ; Mauren, Susan ; Hunter, John. / Intermediate follow-up of laparoscopic antireflux surgery. In: American Journal of Surgery. 1996 ; Vol. 171, No. 1. pp. 32-35.
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